Why Blue Yeti Podcasting Microphones Are Not A Good Choice

I have to admit my Podcasting Microphone Pet Peeve: The Blue Yeti Mic. Recently I attended a coaching group meetup, and the presenter was a consultant who also considered herself a podcasting expert. And it was put to us in dogmatically certain terms that "The Blue Yeti Podcasting Mic Is Simply The Best Microphone For Podcasters". And in this post it is my solemn duty to disabuse our dear prospects and Yeti fans of this notion.

First of all: There is no such thing as a Blue Yeti Podcasting Mic. It is simply the Blue Yeti Mic. At the coaching meetup I kept my mouth shut, but it was hard. And, this is not the first time I heard this, and we have worked with lots of podcast clients who approach us with initial Blue Yeti podcasting pride.

Microphone talk is a favorite topic among podcasters, and mostly beside the point.

Great microphones never guarantee a great podcast.

But the blind devotion that the Blue Yeti seems to inspire among novice podcasters has always been a source of mystery for me. The Blue Yeti may be an excellent microphone, technically speaking. But it is usually the wrong choice for podcasting, for the following reasons:

Why the Blue Yeti Podcasting Microphone Is Often The Wrong Choice For Podcasters:

Blue Yeti Podcasting Microphone Is Often The Wrong Choice
Photographer: Jon Tyson | Source: Unsplash
  1. It is a condenser mic, not a dynamic mic. Condenser mics will pick up sounds a mile away, and there are indeed valid concerns around air conditioners running etc. 
  2. This also means they pick up the sound of the room. If you are recording in a kitchen, bathroom or basement, the sound of the room, and the reverberations in it, will be super apparent. There is no way to remove reverberation once recorded. So for your ghost story podcast the "basement sound" might be ideal. In most other cases, not so much.
  3. The Blue Yeti in particular, in spite of its sexy switches and cardioid pattern option, is “roomy” sounding, not what you want for distraction free and intimate sounding audio.
  4. The Blue Yeti is heavy, large, and cannot easily be mounted on a boom arm, which is necessary to move it close enough.
  5. Most people make the mistake of leaving the Yeti on its stand positioned on their desk, 1-2 feet from their mouth – instead of having it inches away from their mouth. A desk stand Yeti is never going to sound great, unless you are in a sound isolated booth or purposefully built studio. 
  6. The Yeti is an expensive choice, once you buy the shock mount and boom arm and pop filter needed to use it in a “podcasting setup” – in other words close to your mouth.

The Advantages Of Dynamic Mics

Dynamic mic advantages compared to Blue Yeti Podcasting Mics
Photographer: Bogomil Mihaylov | Source: Unsplash
  • Dynamic mics on the other hand reject much of the background noise and are ideal for podcasting.
  • They are also less costly.
  • They are easy to mount on a boom arm, a must have for podcasters in getting their mics close enough while also being comfortable.
  • Lastly there are options with BOTH XLR professionally grounded cables, as WELL AS USB connectivity.

One last thing: USB connections will seldom be enough for a strong enough recording signal, for either dynamic or condenser mics with built in USB connectivity.

Better sound comes from a XLR condenser mic not directly connected to your PC or Mac directly, but going through a small desk USB pre-amp like the Focusrite in the equipment list below. Here is a direct link to what most of our podcast clients use (a budget conscious version, the mic is $79): 

Podcasting Starter Pack
From our Podcasting Resources Guide, the One Person Solo (or Interview) Starter Package

So I am sorry if some of this is unwelcome news. 

And if you are committed to using a Blue Yeti, feel free to ignore this advice.

I do not know why the Blue Yeti inspires such devotion among some people. I have yet to meet a podcaster with more than 10 episodes under their belt that still has it. But for podcasters that inherited the device , or are not able to spend money on a new mic, here are some tips to make the Blue Yeti work better:

Tips to Make The Blue Yeti Work For Podcasting

Recording in a closet with a Blue Yeti
Photographer: Adrienne Leonard | Source: Unsplash
  • If you have a sound proof, purposefully built studio to record in, ignore this post, your Blue Yeti will work fine. Then again, if you have a purposefully built studio, you are extremely unlikely to own (or want to use) a Blue Yeti in the first place.
  • If you have a small closet, are not claustrophobic and comfortable in small spaces, your Yeti will work.
  • If you have lots of furniture and carpets in the room, and few reflective surfaces, and can position yourself close to the mic, your Yeti might just work.
  • But be sure to do a test recording and listen to it – before recording that epic 1st one hour episode.

End of rant.