Posts

NOTE: What follows is a guest post from Amir Shahzeidi on YouTube For Podcast Promotion – and while we at Polymash may not agree with all the points in this article, we agree with the power of YouTube for creating short native video content for your podcast growth. Here is Amir's article with a lot of insights and tips on how to make this work:

Your podcast is out there. You’ve consistently put in the hours to create amazing episodes to attract more listeners. But something’s amiss… You can’t seem to get any traction. You’re not generating the growth you need. Here’s the thing, building a business and brand today is less about selling and more about showing how you can add value to your audience’s lives.

And that’s probably one of the main reasons why you started your podcast.

Adding value, however, involves more than just creating great content. You need to promote it feverishly to capture the attention and hold the attention of your target audience.

The former, unfortunately, isn’t always the easiest for brands to accomplish. Most brands still believe in building content and hoping their ideal customers will stumble upon it.

That does not make for sound marketing practice or strategy.

Marketing needs to be consistent.

Take the rule of seven, it dictates that customers need to see or hear of you brand seven times before they become a customer. What’s more, with the increase in web content and social media posts produces each day, I’d argue that customers may need more than seven interactions.

So, how do you promote your podcast effectively?

Have you considered YouTube?

Consider using youtube for podcast promotion
Consider using YouTube for podcast promotion – Photographer: Sara Kurfeß | Source: Unsplash

It may seem almost counter-intuitive as an idea, but there’s a lot of logic behind using it as a marketing channel to grow your podcast.

For example, YouTube is still the 2nd largest search engine in the world. It receives 1 billion users each month (that’s almost a 3rd of the internet).

It's also great for reach. More than 70% of YouTube users watch content on mobile devices, making it the perfect platform to engage more people. In fact, today YouTube is available in 80 languages, making it accessible to 95% of the Internet population.

As you can see, you can leverage YouTube. In fact, you could grow your podcast with the help of a YouTube marketing funnel filled with content that attracts and helps convert viewers into subscribers and paying customers.

But can you really promote your podcast on YouTube?

Yes, and I'll show you four ways to do so.

What do the results look like? Here's a snapshot of the first five results for the search term podcast on YouTube:

YouTube For Podcast Promotion Examples

Take a look at the number of views that each podcast has received.

Pretty convincing, right?

Here are four ways to promote your podcast on YouTube:

1. Upload Your Podcast Audio

This is an easy action to take. Simply upload your podcasts to your YouTube channel. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to shoot video content to get views.

In the example below, CrypoWZRD shows that it’s possible to build an audience with a simple still image and podcast audio.

2. Create Shorter Videos

Another great way to promote your podcast is by creating a trailer or shorter videos from your material. This gives viewers a taste of what to expect, and if promoted using paid media, you should be able to generate a fair amount of reach, too.

Carrier created a trailer for their podcast that’s both captivating and has generated over 2,300 views.

3. Go Live

Live streaming isn’t limited to social media or special events. It’s also used for podcasts. RachelVlogs hosts a podcast called “All Things Internet.” She shows that it’s possible to live stream your podcast on YouTube, without a sophisticated studio or equipment.

4. Create Video Podcasts

Most podcasts are released as pre-recorded videos, and you should give this option a go. Video podcasts are intimate due to the ability to see the host and guest.

Because they are also pre-recorded, you’re able to edit your footage and include different camera shots and special effects to create a more engaging viewer experience.

Now that you have four ways to market your podcast, let’s take a look at how to make your content stand out on YouTube.

Four Tips on Generating Better Rankings When Using Youtube For Podcast Promotion

Here are four more tips to help you generate better rankings, more views, and subscribers.

Tip #1: Use YouTube SEO

Like Google, YouTube videos and content can also be optimized for search. In fact, when using YouTube for podcast promotion some of the same principles apply and can help you rank your podcast videos higher in search results and get more views on YouTube.

For example, you should be using keywords in video titles. Beyond the obvious benefit of viewer spotting search terms, YouTube will be able to return your podcast as a result.

Be sure to include your keywords in descriptions as well. YouTube sees descriptions as valuable, because, just like Google, YouTube wants to provide users with the best possible results for their searches.

Should you use tags?

The jury is still out on this feature. It appears to be available for a reason, so use them, but only add relevant tags to describe your video.

Brian Dean on video SEO when using YouTube For Podcast Promotion
Brian Dean on video SEO when using YouTube For Podcast Promotion

Tip #2: Design a Captivating Thumbnails

Want to make your content stand out? Here are four tips on designing a thumbnail that will grab attention:

Use Color

The human eye is drawn to color. While it can see 7,000,000 colors, creating a combination that’s attractive is really what will stop viewers from scrolling through their feeds.

When you use color, focus on contrasting complementary colors (colors further away from each other on the color wheel). Doing so will create the right amount of contrast between colors you use and help your content stand out.

Use of color when creating YouTube Thumbnails for podcast promotions
Use of color when creating YouTube Thumbnails for podcast promotions

Add Your Face

People are attracted to faces that show a certain emotion or appear to be communicating a message.

If you’re only uploading audio of your podcast, don’t add a clip of your face. This could be perceived as clickbait and might hurt your brand.

Using Faces when creating YoutTube Video Thumbnails for Podcasts
Using Faces when creating YoutTube Video Thumbnails for Podcasts

Brand Your Content

Building a brand is all about becoming recognizable for what you do. Don’t miss the opportunity to brand your thumbnail with your logo.

Branded content example when using YouTube for podcast growth
Branded content example when using YouTube for podcast growth

Create Interesting Titles

Get creative with your thumbnails by using different copy, but keep it related to your video title. This hack makes your content appear more interesting than using repetitive messaging.

Interesting titles are key when using Youtube for podcast marketing
Interesting titles are key when using Youtube for podcast marketing

Tip #3: Focus on Watch-Time

Watch-time is one of the most important ranking factors YouTube applies. Briggsby conducted a study that showed a correlation between watch-time and rankings. They found that the more watch-time a video receives, the higher it ranks in search. So how do you use this insight when using YouTube for podcast promotion?

Maximizing Watch Time for Youtube Analytics
Image: Briggsby

One of the most effective ways of increasing watch-time is by introducing pattern interrupts. These are ideas that are abruptly introduced to completely change the focus of your listeners.

And they’re effective! Buzzsumo used pattern interrupts to grow its channel by 59% in just 30 days.

Why do pattern interrupts work?

They force listeners to pay attention for longer. By asking a question or painting a picture, you automatically engage your audience.

If they’re paying attention for longer, you’ll be able to increase your watch-time and increase the likelihood of better rankings for your podcast.

Tip #4: Use a Call to Action

You’ve managed to attract new YouTube viewers, but what happens when they are done with your video?

While call to actions are a universal component in marketing, they’re often not allows applied.

Don’t be like other marketers.

Include call to actions at the end of each video you upload to ensure that you grow and retain your audience.

What kind call to actions should you use?

In the YouTube for podcast promotion example below, Tom Ferry uses a video suggestion and a link to his website where you can get show notes and also listen to other podcasts.

Show notes links are important

Ferry also takes advantage of the description section on YouTube. In addition to his brief write-up, he pushes viewers to other links that include the episode’s show notes, various platforms to listen to his podcast, and his social media accounts to connect with him directly.

Ferry also has his own branded website. If you plan on growing your podcast, with the prospect of developing a multimedia platform of your own, you could create a video website.

Everyone knows that YouTubers make money from ads (and some from endorsements), but few know that almost 96.5% of YouTube video creators don’t make enough to rise above the poverty line.

By creating your own platform, you’re able to generate revenue for your brand by selling your podcast and video content directly to your subscribers.

Tom Ferry Example

Conclusion

Podcasts, like all other marketing channels, can only grow if promoted. One of the most interesting ways is to expand your content with video and to use Youtube for podcast promotion. It’s a large platform with over a billion users, making it the perfect place to find your audience. It also affords podcasters the opportunity to promote their content in various ways, making is easier to attract and engage more viewers and turn them into subscribers.

About Our Guest Author Amir Shahzeidi:

Amir Shahzeidi
Amir Shahzeidi

Amir is the digital marketing manager at Uscreen, an all-in-one video monetization and live streaming platform that empowers video entrepreneurs and creators to monetize their content and build thriving businesses around their videos.

What's a truly viable podcast audiogram alternative for promotion and visual storytelling? I've been looking into video and audiogram platforms and tools to help promote podcasts on social media – particularly beneficial for that back-log of episodes that offer evergreen content that are still highly valuable. Using video as a way to bring your back catalogue to life is a no-brainer!

In this post, I explain how excited we are about the InVideo platform. It is an alternative to pure audiogram platforms, and an easy way of using short videos to tell the story of podcast episodes. Most podcasters are already familiar with audiograms for social sharing of podcast episodes.

I've been wondering if podcast audiograms are really the best way to promote in a "video" format, and if there might be better alternatives.

We think the overall effect is visually more compelling than ordinary audiograms.

Those of you who know me accept that I'm somewhat geeky when it comes to tools and process automation. I have this knack (my wife, the Positivity Strategist calls it a gift) of taking seemingly unrelated things and mashing them in some way. (And now you also know why my business is called Polymash.) I mash many things. I can see connections and relationships in things that at face value are not meant to be mashed. Maybe that's what leads to innovations, and is definitely about next-level thinking.

Table Of Contents

  1. What We Want From Our Podcast Audiograms
  2. Challenging Some Assumptions
  3. The Emergence of Audiogram Alternatives
  4. Introducing InVideo, our Podcast Visual Story Platform of Choice
  5. InVideo Podcast Audiogram Creation Demo
  6. InVideo Applications Beyond Podcasting
  7. Get 75% Off Invideo Paid Plans

What We Want From Our Podcast Audiograms

Podcast Audiogram Production
Photographer: Wahid Khene | Source: Unsplash

Are we really clear about what we want from our audiograms? What is attractive and enticing is the promise of

  • Easy "Repurposing" a piece of audio into video format
  • More shares and listens for your podcast episodes
  • Increased organic reach on social media
  • Greater discoverability for your podcast as a whole

I'd like us to look into these promises and underlying assumptions.

But first, some basic background.

What Are Podcast Audiograms and Why Are They Popular?

podcast examples of audiograms
Some examples of audiograms

Podcast Audiograms are a way to produce social media-ready video from a piece of audio.

  • Typically, audiograms feature a static image with room for the "waveform" as an animated element.
  • Audiograms also offer captions as a way to see what is being talked about with the audio on mute, which is how audiograms most often appear in a social feed.
  • Most often, these audiogram videos are designed for use on social media and are relatively short, from 20 seconds through several minutes.
  • Below a Twitter example:

When audiograms first became popular a few years ago, Facebook had started to emphasize and favor video in their feeds. Videos auto-play (with the audio on mute) in Facebook feeds, and those moving images capture our attention as we scroll through our feeds. Other social platforms like Twitter and Instagram followed suit, and before long podcasters were trying to figure out the best way to promote their episode on those platforms using video.

How do you convert a podcast into a video?

For podcasters, converting episode audio into video has always been possible, but over the last few years several platforms have emerged that make this easier.

The available audiogram specific platforms are improving, and are in the process of automating some of this workflow, but for me it is not just about saving time through automation.

Platform Maturity – Ready For Primetime?

Some of the podcast audiogram platforms out there have not reached the kind of maturity level I would expect, as an ex UI designer.

Notice how the captions are covered!

I won't name names, but above is a rather poor example.

  • This is from a major audiogram platform
  • The auto-generated captions aligned to the bottom of a Facebook post, and are being covered by the Facebook player chrome.
  • There are no options for text size, text styling, colors, font choices, and most importantly the position of where the text occurs.
  • Who tests, approves and releases this stuff?

Platforms are improving, but still when compared to cloud based video tools, podcast audiogram platforms are relatively clunky.

Challenging Some Audiogram Assumptions

Shiny Object Syndrome
Photographer: Clem Onojeghuo | Source: Unsplash

We might favor and use audiogram specific platforms, but I feel that we podcasters have gotten sucked into "shiny new object" thinking. Let me ask some basic questions to challenge our assumptions about podcast audiograms:

Do we really need those "waveforms"?

  • For me, the waveform display is only there as a decoration, a way to provide animation to an otherwise static image.
  • Sure, it is mesmerizing to look at for a few seconds, but does not add value beyond that.

Must we always use an actual clip from the podcast episode we are promoting?

  • I propose that existing episode audio is not always the best or only way to tell a story or summarize the content of an episode.
  • In fact, very few people will go through the trouble of un-muting the video to actually listen to the audio content.

Are podcast audiograms the best way to visually tell the story of your episode?

  • My hypothesis is that the visuals are what's most important to grab the attention of people watching the audiogram on a social feed.
  • But frankly, a static image with a waveform and captions is pretty boring to look at, and does not visually tell a story, or stimulate the imagination.

Do podcast audiogram creation platforms save time compared to alternatives?

For most platforms, the workflow involved is to

  1. Locate a suitable piece of audio that represents a "sharable" snippet or quote from the episode. This alone can be very time consuming.
  2. Extract this snippet of audio from the podcast
  3. Upload the audio snippet into the podcast audiogram platform
  4. Transcribe the audio into text
  5. Edit the transcription
  6. Apply a branding template or an episode specific background image
  7. Export the resulting video

There are at least 7 steps. That takes a fair amount of precious time. If you're like me, you value your time.

Next-level thinking kicks in: what are the alternatives?

The Emergence of Audiogram Alternatives

So here is the "Polymashing" part. As a small creative agency, we have used a number of video generation platforms over the years. They are designed for creating marketing & social videos in minutes. Sound familiar? Platforms like:

More Visual Storytelling for Podcasts

And in applying "Next-level thinking about audiograms" it occurred to me that these platforms excel at visual storytelling in a way the ordinary podcast audiogram platforms do not.

  • Why limit ourselves to a single static images with a waveform as the only piece of interest?
  • Why use an audio snippet to start with, when a written episode description can serve as a quick script?
  • Why obsess about using host read audio at all, when few people "unmute" to listen as posts travel through their social media timelines?
  • Why not use multiple, quick scenes to create more interesting video?

Why InVideo is our Podcast Visual Story Platform of Choice

Invideo Visual Storytelling For Audiograms
Disclosure: I will earn a small affiliate commission at no cost to you – should you ever upgrade to a paid plan

Having used a range of other online video tools, I've landed on InVideo for a whole number of reasons.

Reasons Why We Are Using InVideo

It helps us to create professional-level videos in minutes with pre-made templates. The user interface is highly intuitive and offers wide scope for being creative. It makes creating videos to promote shows really easy and fun. And it does so in multiple ways that go far beyond the uni-dimensional video of an audio wave.

Audio-visual storytelling for episode promo videos is made easy, using the text to video mode.

Our workflow is to paste in an episode summary, break it into segments, and InVideo will automatically produce multiple short video scenes for each segment from my choices.

It comes with a vast library of video clips, and of course we can upload our own as well, so we get to use existing episode level artwork in the video.

Easy to Use Interface

As a former UX and interface designer, I appreciate the "Easy to Use" interface mode, all the while still having access to more "Advanced" features that allow trimming clips, cropping frames, looping video, and tons more.

Speedy and Fast

I've measured how long it takes us to produce podcast audiogram content using InVideo versus 3-4 other platforms, and InVideo is by far the fastest to use.

Performance

Also, internal servers seem to perform more quickly when exporting videos and doing video previews, something that had always frustrated me with other platforms.

Multiple Modes

First of all, this platform can be applied in multiple ways that are useful for not just podcast promotion, but for multiple video purposes:

  • Text To Video
  • Marketing Videos
  • Social Videos
  • PR videos

Last but not Least: Great Value

InVideo also offers great value, with more affordable price-to-feature ratio when compared to the high subscription rates of other platforms.

InVideo Podcast Audiogram Creation Demo

Here is a video walk-through of how we use the Invideo "text to video" mode to create our podcast storytelling videos to replace our podcast audiograms:

InVideo Applications Beyond Podcasting

There are virtually limitless use cases, and perhaps the best way to get some inspiration is to visit their site for some examples:

inVideo examples
Check out the types of videos you can produce with inVideo beyond podcasting

Conclusion And A Special Offer

No matter if you are creating audiograms now, or if you've been curious about trying to share your episodes in a story telling video, you owe it to yourself to check out inVideo.

InVideo Free Sign Up

They offer a "Forever Free" plan, which is a great way to get started. If you found this review valuable, I'd appreciate if you would use my affiliate link below to sign up.

Try InVideo for Podcast Audiogram Creation
Disclosure: I will earn a small affiliate commission at no cost to you – should you ever upgrade to a paid plan

Special Coupon Code For Polymash Readers, 75% Off

Not only have the guys over at InVideo been great with rapidly developing new platform features and with support, but they also have made paid plans a no-brainer with this special offer: Use the code 'InVideo75' when signing up for a paid plan to receive 75% off.

In this season we have occasionally touched up our own podcast workflow. For those of you who follow us, you realize that we often talk about "podcasting as a content strategy". So as we approach the end of season 1 of our Podcast Growth Show, I thought it was time to zoom out for a big picture episode.

Basically, this episode is our blueprint to go from podcast content strategy to execution.

Podcast Workflow Overview

Here is how to listen to this episode on the web:

From Podcasting Strategy to Execution Blueprint

From Podcasting Strategy to Execution
From Podcasting Strategy to Execution Blueprint, Click for expanded detail

So I'd like to reveal our overall podcast workflow, all the way from strategy to execution. And in this episode I'll reveal all our little secret tips, tricks, tools and gear we use to save massive amount of time along the way.

Strategy Segment

For both new and existing podcasts, it is good to start with the end in mind, to have clarity about your audience, as well as confidence that the value proposition for your listeners, as well as the reason why you are doing a podcast is clear.

Planning Segment

A lot of people just want to get started and hit the record button already. But unless you already have a dozen or so episodes under your belt, you will discover that there is a lot of planning involved. Especially if podcasting as content strategy is something even remotely on your horizon. I talk to new podcasters all the time, and some get lost in the planning stage. Let's discover how having a planning framework helps us retain clarity.

Execution Segment

I'd like to go into how we approach podcast production ourselves. This is only one of many possible ways, and in no way am I suggesting you should adopt our methods. There is a lot involved, and it can sound scary. We tolerate an amount of complexity because it produces results for us. And complexity doesn't mean things can't be automated, simplified or even outsourced. Both complexity and simplicity can co-exist. For us, it's the results that count.

Promotion Segment

This entire season has been about how to promote a podcast. So we may already have covered some of the methods we use to promote each episode. I'll keep that segment short.

Season Strategy

Podcast seasons can help organize our podcast workflow
Podcast seasons can help organize our podcast content strategy

We like the concept of seasons, as it provides some amount of flexibility when thinking about the overall goals for your podcast as business content strategy.

Advantage of Seasons

Do we have a solo show or an interview based show? Do we have a co-host? Does our podcast have a theme? Would we like to try a different episode structure? Are we afraid your audience is getting bored with our content? What if we want to change up? Or are we suffering from "podfading" and just plain tired and need a break?

All of these can be addressed by organizing our podcast into separate seasons:

  • They allow us to take a sabbatical from your own show if we need a break
  • They enable us to develop focused themes for each season
  • We can switch the format of the show, including who is hosting, guesting or if it's a solo show
  • And all of that with no surprises for our listeners, as we announce the end of the current or start of the next seasons
  • Each season is a good excuse for a podcast re-launch and much needed promotional activities

Value Proposition Design

I know a lot of podcasters who just barrel on producing episode after episode without ever pausing, re-thinking, changing direction or taking stock. There is nothing wrong with that, as long as the audience is with us on this.

Other podcasters plan each season carefully, and conceptualize exactly what they want to cover, who their guests will be, and most importantly what experience they want to create for their audience. Either way:

Periodically revisiting the value proposition of our podcast is an excellent habit.

But just how we do that? We have developed a process for developing a podcast's branding and value proposition. This Value Proposition Design (VPD) process is driven by over a hundred trigger questions designed to achieve clarity about our audience. To be more specific, clarity about what our listening audience is experiencing, what problems we help them solve or wrestle with, and what goals and transformation we help them achieve.

Not only that, there are also over 100 trigger questions to get us to think about how well our podcast topics match up to our audience desires, needs, tasks and expectations.

We have online forms for these trigger questions, and the answers we produce during this process are worth their weight in gold: They become a rich source of podcast themes, episode topics, SEO keywords, episode titles.

Think of your podcast as a product – with a market fit

This clarity is what you can when going through the VPD process.

Focus on Overall Goals

It is also important to keep focused on our podcast goals, and to periodically revisit these.

Perhaps we started out just wanting to have fun and get our message out to the world, but now we are finding ourselves wanting to build a list, or speak on stages, or to use your podcast as a vehicle to help promote a book. These are significant shifts in goals, and require significant adjustments to the way we utilize and market our podcast.

Strategy Planning Session 3 Month

Of course none of this has to do with the week to week podcast workflow of producing episodes in the middle of a season.

I'm just pointing all of this out as an important baseline activity that we try to do every 3 months or so. And to point out 3 things:

  1. If you are about to launch a podcast, take the time to go through the VPD process to achieve clarity and a product market fit for your show
  2. If you already started to podcast without any of this in mind, it's not too late to start and revisit once in a while
  3. If you have a podcast based on seasons, revisit your goals and value proposition for each seasons

Podcast Episode SEO Research

SEO for Podcasts

Why do we do SEO research for something audio based?

SEO = Developing A Business Asset With Positive ROI

Our own podcast website gets 65% of subscribers from SEO search. 50% of my new clients come from search. Our podcast is less than 2 months old at the time of this recording, and has yielded 4 new clients and many more prospects. Not from iTunes discoverability, not referrals. So our entire podcast workflow is based on solid SEO research.

You may think that this is all overkill. And again, I will point out that this is just the process we follow because it works for us and our results speak for themselves. BTW, we have a whole course on podcast SEO.

For Our Podcast, 80% Planning and 20% Execution is Normal

Topical Research

So the assumption is that we do have clarity about our goals and value proposition for the audience. At this point, we want to identify potential SEO opportunities and turn these into topics for our season long episode plan.

The goal is to be able to rank for our show notes pages.

And there are 2 important pitfalls that we avoid by doing some quick SEO research:

  1. If we target impossibly difficult keywords, we will never rank on page one in Google, and thus we will never get search result traffic or new listeners
  2. If we target obscure keywords that no one ever searches for, we may rank on page one of the search results, but no one will ever visit our podcast from that.

SEO Keyword Opportunities

I myself may have a bit of an unfair advantage, because Polymash started life in part as an SEO agency. So we have access to some enterprise level SEO tools.

But the good news for podcasters is that there are affordable and even free tools out there to do the same thing.

So here is a quick demo (at 13:50 ) of how we identify high opportunity keywords using Mangool's SEO suite, particularly the KWFinder utility. This is a central part of our podcast workflow, and KWFinder is by far my favorite and simple to use SEO keyword research tool. We have coached a ton of podcasters to use it to good effect.

Disclosure: This free sign up is an affiliate link

It gets better: This keyword research tool is only on part of an entire SEO suite to quickly add the following capabilities to your podcast planning:

  • KWFinder: Our favorite keyword research utility for podcasters.
  • SERP Watcher: Allows us to track progress as you start ranking for your desired keywords
  • SERP Checker: Provides deep insights into Google search results, and allows us to judge which keywords to target and which to stay away from

Converting Podcast SEO Keywords into Episode Ideas

So in the podcast workflow, once we have identified a list of keywords with potential, it is time to take these keywords and base our episode plan on these.

In our Google Sheets planning template we have developed a formula to address the following SEO issue:

Each site has something called Domain Authority and Alexa Rank, which indicates how likely the site's content will rank on Google. This means every site needs to target keywords that are commensurate with their Domain Authority and Alexa Rank.

For old, established and popular sites it is easier to rank for more difficult keywords.

But new site owners with low DA and Alexa rank need to choose key-phrases they can actually rank for.

The formula we have developed matches the domain authority of any site with the keyword difficulty to target on KW Finder. This is all about prioritizing high opportunity topics, from high opportunity keywords.

Google Sheets to Organize Output

We have developed a Google Sheets template to help map this out.

Episode Topic Identification

Identifying topics for each podcast season
Identifying topics for each podcast season

Here is the process we follow to identify episode themes and topics based on our Podcast SEO research.

SEO Based Topics

As I mentioned earlier, we base our podcast episodes on our prior SEO research. By the time we are mid-season, we usually have a range of potential topics for a season to choose from, and hundreds of potential SEO keywords to choose from as well.

Initial Titles

Initially we develop working titles for each episode before we even incorporate relevant SEO keywords from our list. But at some point it is important to design episode titles with relevant keywords that fits the topic, and that are commensurate with the ranking power of our site as well.

Episode Title Optimization

The exact wording of our episode titles is more important than many podcasters realize. You can have a great episode, but if the title is not compelling, click worthy, interesting or thought provoking, people will never click through.

Sure, your existing subscribers may listen. But this is about attracting new listeners and subscribers. Just think about where your episode titles appear, and what role they play in your podcast workflow and the way people consume podcasts.

  • People may see your episode title on their iPhone or listening device of choice. Will they be interested enough to tap and listen?
  • People may come across your show notes and episodes as a result of a Google search. But will your episode title be compelling enough for them click through?
  • Your episodes titles may appear on social media, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter. Will it arouse people's curiosity?

So what makes a click-worthy episode title?

CoSchedule Headline Optimizer

There are a bunch of tools out there that help, for example the CoSchedule Headline Analyzer. CoSchedule is a well know the social media scheduling platform we use, and they have developed a wonderful tool for designing highly converting titles for blog posts as well as for podcast episodes.

The tool is free, and you can try it out here. Their recommendations are based on a ton of research, word usage and title patterns proven to be successful on social media. Their algorithm checks for the presence of unusual words, power words, emotional words and the structure and length of each title.

Of course, fair warning: Don't become a slave to such a tool.

Making Title Optimization Part of our Podcast Workflow

But my point is more about following this thinking process and formulating a range of potential titles. I guarantee you this: If you formulate only a single title for each episode, it will never be as good as if you formulate 7+ titles to choose from. So it is making this discipline part of our podcast workflow that makes all the difference.

Google Sheets to Organize Output

For us to stay organized and to collaborate on SEO research as well as podcast topic and title planning, we again use our trusty Google sheet template to stay organized.

Episode Recording Preparation

Episode Recording And Script Preparation
Episode Recording And Script Preparation

OK so we've finally gotten closer to actually recording an episode.

Pre Recording Notes

Our own podcast's current season is a solo recording effort.

Using StoryChief For Script Development Ahead Of Time

If you've listened to our previous episode "How To: Easy Podcast Distribution And Content Syndication [S1E08]", you would have learned about the StoryChief app we use to distribute our show notes to more than 16+ platforms.

Podcast Syndication With StoryChief

But we also use StoryChief to develop our solo episode scripts. This saves us a lot of time later, after the recording process. And because this season is video based, the podcast workflow to incorporate video is by nature a bit harder.

If you are interested in giving StoryChief a try, they offer a free account:

Our podcast workflow utilizes Story Chief
Disclosure: This free sign up is an affiliate link, if you choose to upgrade the account later

Beyond this it's 5 stories for 10$/month, 10 stories for 20$/month, 15 for 30, 20 for 40, 25 for 50 up until 30 for 60$; and 20% discount if you pay yearly.

Episode Specific Template Google Docs

Google docs are great for collaboration with clients, and we have designed our template to work for preparing, ID3 tagging, and creating show notes.

Episode Metadata

Our episode preparation template on Google docs that works for solo, interview or co-host driven formats. We also use this for our own podcast, but that is for capturing titles, descriptions, video metadata, ID3 tag information, embed codes for the episodes once everything is done.

Episode Video Data

This season combines an audio podcast with a video tutorials, demos and more. Because we cross publish each episode to our YouTube Channel as well, it is important to formulate the YouTube tags, description and links for each episode, and again our template allows for this.

Our Podcast Workflow Process for Video + Audio Recording

Podcast production workflow containing audio as well as video
Podcast production workflow containing audio as well as video

Finally, after all this planning, we are ready to record something.

ScreenFlow Video Templates For Youtube Channels

I use a somewhat unusual setup for podcast + video recording. You may have heard of desktop screen recorders like Techsmith's Camtasia and Telestream ScreenFlow? These are screen recorders that also use your webcam. Many people use them for creating courseware or evergreen webinar content. We've used both extensively here at Polymash. But for our podcast workflow a clear winner emerged:

ScreenFlow launched an innovation this year that I had been looking for a long time.

It automates the production process with the ability to configure recording templates. These templates then place your video into a template with a pre-existing intro, outro, lower thirds, resizing and repositioning the webcam image as a picture in picture on the screen.

ScreenFlow templates save us an amazing amount of time for our YouTube channel

If you click play on the video above, you can see the effect. After the initial setup of my YouTube channel, I do nothing more to produce these videos, other than to press the record button. Clever, no?

If you are relatively new to podcast, and video is not something you are considerding right off the bat, here is our review of several new and highly innovative podcast recording software

TelePrompter Secrets

You might also have noticed that in my opening sequences I talk directly to the camera. Hopefully I come across as fluent in these videos, but what you may not realize is that I'm assisted by a mini teleprompter attached to my webcam.

  • My scripts live on an iPad on my desk, which I can speed up or slow down as I record. It's a strictly one man operation.
  • The actual teleprompting screen is driven by my iPhone, and all of this allows me to look directly into the camera as I record my episodes.

If you are curious about this setup, below is an (affiliate) link to this amazingly small and affordable teleprompting device.

Meet our unique mini teleprompter

Big part of our podcast workflow: The ability to record smooth video
Big part of our podcast workflow: The ability to record smooth video

We use a compact, versatile, and easy to use teleprompter that helps us quickly deliver polished show notes to our listeners.  Until now, teleprompters have been clunky, expensive, and difficult to operate–and many required film studios or a production team.  This teleprompter changes all of that.  

It’s a simple tool that helps us nail smooth delivery using just a smartphone and our desktop computer, DSLR, or webcam.

Our video production workflow is so much easier using a mini teleprompter
Our video production workflow is so much easier using a mini teleprompter

Podcast Quality Audio While Recording Video

One issue with doing a video podcast, especially one where one stands or moves around, is audio quality.

While sitting I can use my microphone and arm easily, but if I'm standing or moving around I like to use a wireless mic. This is also true for general video production or conducting on-camera interviews. I really did a lot of research before investing in this piece of kit.

What we use is what I feel is the most affordable and yet high quality pair of wireless lavalier microphones on the market. I think the quality is as good as the famous Sennheisers, but the price is 1/2. The system is called the COMICA CVM-WM300(A). There is also an optional interview mic to take this setup on the road and conduct amazing mobile podcasts and or video interviews.

Again, if you'd like to check it out, below is an (affiliate) link.

Lavalier systems can be useful add ons to podcast and video recording workflows
Lavalier systems can be useful add ons to podcast and video recording workflows

Live Audio through Loopback and Audio Hijack

We produce our client podcasts using a professional audio editing platform called Adobe Audition.

One of my favorite things is when podcast clients comment on how amazing they sound on the podcasts we produce for them.

This is in part because as a former audio engineer and record producer I have a few tricks up my sleeve to get that professional "broadcast" sound. (Let me know in the comments if I should do a special episode on that, happy to share!)

But it is also because Adobe Audition comes with some professional and sophisticated tools to help us shape a warm and inviting sound profile for each podcast host of guest.

So far, so good. But when recording video as well as an audio podcast, things become more complicated. And time consuming.

We would have to extract the audio tracks from video to import them into Adobe Audition to achieve the same custom broadcast ready sound, and then re-import them into the video. Too much work…

Luckily, I'm both lazy and smart:

Loopback interface for routing audio on my desktop
Loopback interface for routing audio on my desktop

So we've come up with a shortcut to get broadcast quality video sound, using 2 apps by a company called Rogue Amoeba:

  1. Loopback to create virtual audio devices to take the sound from apps and audio input devices, then pass it to any audio processing software.
  2. Audio Hijack, which functions like a real-time, virtual mixing console with EQ, compression and noise gating built in.

These 2 apps allow me to apply sound profiles in real time. Ordinarily this is done with a mixing console or in post-production, but this happens live. So the final video has that "broadcast" ready sound as it is being recorded.

Our Audio Hijack setup to produce real time optimized audio
Our Audio Hijack setup to produce real time optimized audio

The other advantage is that I can create profiles to attempt to make my lavaliers sound the same or similar to my Heil PR40 mic. (I can hear audiophiles groaning now). But at least I can get similar sound quality.

Audio Extraction and .mp3 Files From Video

Our podcast workflow includes several conversion tasks
Our podcast workflow includes several conversion tasks

So now that we have the video portion of our podcast recorded, it's time to extract the audio from the video and to export and upload it to our podcasts' .mp3 file

Video to Audio Conversion

We use the Wondershare Video Converter app to extract a high quality audio file from the video.

Loudness Standards, Noise Removal, Voice Leveling

A swiss company called Auphonic has developed a brilliant set of audio automation tools every podcaster should check out. We use Auphonic desktop app to automate the following steps:

  1. Establish a noise profile
  2. Applying Noise reduction from that noise profile
  3. Speech Volume Leveling
  4. Industry standard loudness standards for broadcast ready files at -16LUF
  5. Export to .mp3 formatted output file

This automation saves us at least 20 minutes per episode.

Audio Export to Libsyn

So now we finally have the .mp3 file to upload and release on our podcast hosting software Libsyn. First we apply the episodes title, descriptions and other podcast metadata to the .mp3 file. Then we upload to Libsyn and schedule the episode to go live at the desired time.

Video Export to YouTube

Remember we are using Screenflow to record our video content. It has the built in ability to export each video to our Youtube channel, including custom thumbnails, tags, descriptions and links. So the video portion of our podcast was already uploaded and scheduled on YouTube in a previous step.

Multi Channel Show Notes Syndication

Sign Up For Free, Disclosure: The above affiliate link, if you choose to upgrade the account later
Sign Up For Free, Disclosure: The above affiliate link, if you choose to upgrade the account later

I will keep this short, since syndication and distribution of show notes was the topic of an entire episode, episode 8. Suffice it to say this:

A critical step in our podcast workflow is to distribute and syndicate our show notes to as many platforms as possible.

After all, our podcast's audio files are being syndicated to be available in iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify and Google Play.

Content syndication with StoryChief is to show notes what RSS feeds are to your podcast audio.

Finalize Episode Show Notes on StoryChief

Because we prepare our episode scripts in StoryChief, by the time we record our episode the show notes are 90% written already.

Embed YouTube Video Player

So all that's left is to embed the episode video into StoryChief.

Embed Libsyn Audio Player

We love StoryChief as a content syndication in part because it is podcast ready. We easily embed the Libsyn player widget into our episode to allow site visitors to choose their modality: Read, Listen or Watch.

Embed Lead Generation Widgets

Another reason we love StoryChief is that it allows for embedding various lead generation and email capture widgets. So if our episode has a "Lead Magnet" like a bonus guide, mind-map or check-list, we embedding it right in the StoryChief show notes.

Publish to 16+ Channels

At the end of the day, our show notes are scheduled to go live and to trickle out to an ever growing list of platforms, communities and blogs and "Ambassador Networks"

1/2 Year Evergreen Social Boost Campaign

Saving time in our podcast workflow involves creating evergreen social campaigns
Saving time in our podcast workflow involves creating evergreen social campaigns

In an upcoming episode I am planning to go into detail about how we create a 1/2 year long automated campaign to promote each episode on social media. Over the years we have tried and used a ton of different platforms for this.

The one I think is most innovative is called CoSchedule. It allows us to design a social campaign on autopilot.

I am lazy, but engagement cannot be automated

I answer every RT, question or DM related to our podcast episodes. But that does not mean I want to spend a lot of time on social media crafting individual tweets and social shares for our episodes.

CoSchedule has a clever automation concept called "social helpers". These are content snippets that help to produce a varied social feed, with different hashtags, images, messages. It shares our episode show notes content, but does not repeat the same tweet or image all the time.

Again, it's the sort of one time up-front effort that takes some time to set up initially, but then saves a ton of time for each episode. If you are interested in seeing this in more detail, let me know in the comments.

Conclusion

Again – this episode was just the process we follow because it is producing results for us. I do not recommend it to everyone, and the fact that we are producing video alongside the audio portion complicates things a bit.

If you are a new podcaster or a business considering podcasting as a content strategy, you may well think all of this is overkill.

But keep in mind that the lion share of the work goes into the initial planning, the setting up of templates and designing and implementing the various automation steps. And this is a one time only effort. And the routine production can be done by other people.

If you'd like to chat and explore possibilities for your own podcast workflow, feel free to book a time with me.

Kevin Carroll, Juli Goldstein, Stephen McCulloch

Developing the Wild Dolphins iPad app with Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute brought us (Polymash) into the true story of Winter, the star of the movie “Dolphin Tale”.

Our friends from Harbor Branch invited us to the Clearwater Premiere to celebrate the release of the movie with them.  While the story surrounding Winter’s rescue and rehabilitation in the movie is fictitious, much about the actual story of Winter herself, particularly her rehabilitation, is a fair representation of what actually happened according to the people involved in Winter’s real life journey.

It was a joy to meet some of the people who were part of both the true story and those who were part of the movie itself.  I’d like to introduce you to just a few of them here.

Susan Mazza and Dan Strempka

Kevin Carroll and Dan Strzempka, the creators of Winter’s prosthetic tale, from Hanger Prosthetics, were as warm and gracious in person as we experienced them in contributing their story to the app.  They expressed their joy in being part of the Winter’s miraculous story, their beautiful relationship with Winter, as well as their gratitude for the incredible team of people who care for her and the people who rescue and care for dolphins every day.  Their significant investment in Winter has clearly been a labor of love and in the process has contributed significantly to the people their company, Hanger Prosthetics, serves.

Read more

The AppAdvice web site is running a podcast feature of our “Wild Dolphins” app next week, from  September 26th through October 2nd. have a look at the background art we created for the podcast… I’ll post a link to the podcast and review of our app next week when it’s live!

[button link=”https://polymash.com/wild-dolphins/” color=”silver”] Check out the Wild Dolphins Home Page[/button]

Polymash Inc. today introduces the FilmOneFest app for iPad. The FilmOneFest app is a collection of one-minute films from filmmakers all around the world with supporting stories, artists’ statements and interviews. The app gives visibility and voice to film makers across the world, enabling their talent to serve and inspire others to question, experiment, explore, laugh, cry, and unite us in our common humanity in this one-minute format.

[button link=”http://prmac.com/release-id-27475.htm” type=”icon” icon=”notice”]Read the Full PR Mac Press Release[/button]

We are pleased to announce that our free FilmOneFest iPad app is now available on the iTunes iPad app store.

FilmOneFest is a celebration of one-minute films as an art form, also a film festival held in Atlantic Highlands, NJ, and the FilmOneFest iPad app is a collection of one-minute films from filmmakers all around the world with supporting stories, artists’ statements, and interviews. To find out more:

[button link=”https://polymash.com/film-one-fest-ipad-app/” type=”icon” icon=”notice”]Visit the FilmOneFest Home Page[/button]

Producing Video: We’re working on our own small 20 second spot”

Interested in finding out more? Learn about the Polymash digital publishing and app development methods, digital publishing webinars, notification of iTunes and Android app releases, Polymash events and tablet publishing news. Please use our contact form for additional information.