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5 reasons why the recommended Facebook ad process to promote a podcasts is flawed

You may think running Facebook Ads would be an excellent vehicle to promote a podcast. Facebook ads allow you to precisely target your audience amd promise to increase your subscribers in a cost-effective way.

And I totally agree. Facebook is the best paid promotion platform for a podcast, our regular listeners may remember Episode 3 "Paid Podcast Advertising – a Look Behind the Scenes".

My point with this episode is not to argue that Facebook is a poor platform to advertise podcasts on. Rather to point out that the Facebook Podcast Promotion Process most bloggers and marketers recommend it is flawed.

There has been a slew of recent posts on how to best advertise podcasts on Facebook. I fundamentally disagree with the premise of these posts. Here is why:

So what’s the problem with using Facebook Ads to promote a podcast?

The issue has to do with where to send traffic once someone clicks on your Facebook ad.

Many marketers recommend promoting Facebook episodes by directly linking to the iTunes or Android or Spotify episode pages.

  • They argue this is better than sending people to a show notes page on your site
  • In fact, many of these posts argue that you don’t need show notes pages at all, or to simply go with your podcast host's default episode pages and minimal content
  • The writers make the point that iTunes and Stitcher is, after all, where you want people to go to subscribe to your show
  • The advice is that direct links to the iTunes episode is the best way for Facebook ads to capture people on mobile devices. And also for targeting Android audiences by sending these ads to Google Play or Stitcher episodes directly

And we see many podcasts following this advice and missing out in the process.

I fundamentally disagree with sending your Facebook Ad traffic directly to your iTunes and Stitcher podcast links for the following five reasons:

#1: It Costs Too Much

The Cost To Promote a Podcast
Facebook Ads cost too much if all they are used for is to send traffic to iTunes

Sure, your ads may get you more listeners for your podcast on iTunes and Stitcher. But Facebook podcast marketing ads should also have a better goal in addition to just adding listeners. Because the cost per new listener is usually quite high.

Think of it this way, in terms of analytics:

“Cost per anonymous listener” IS NOT THE SAME THING AS “Cost per qualified lead or email subscriber.”

Instead, you could be getting greater value and ROI from your Facebook ads by focusing on lead generation and list growth. Instead of on just getting more listeners, you could be adding leads for your business, building your email list, increase the rank and traffic for your site, and building a digital asset for your brand.

FB Ads for Podcasts: ‘Cost per anonymous listener’ <> ‘Cost per qualified lead

#2: iTunes and Google Play Do Not Need More Traffic From Your Facebook Podcast Marketing

Apple and Google don't need more traffic from promoting a podcast
Apple and Google don't need more traffic from your promoting a podcast

You are paying for ads traffic that you are sending to iTunes and Google Play Music.

Really?

Instead, your own site could be benefitting from greater traffic, rank, and authority.

#3: Blind Dates

Would you go on a date without ever asking the other person's name?
Would you go on a date without ever asking the other person's name?

Don't let your site visitors and podcast listeners stay anonymous. That's like going on a date without ever asking the other person's name.

iTunes and Facebook may know who your listeners are. But they won't let you, the publisher, in on that secret. You won’t know how many listeners subscribed to your show on those platforms.

  • Click here for a complete analysis of Google AdWords vs Facebook Advertising for podcasts

More importantly, you don’t know whose these listeners are. Since you are not capturing their email address, you have much less of a chance to engage with them. Even if they are big fans of your show. If you don’t attract listeners to visit your show pages, you are essentially going on blind dates – without ever even asking for a name. So, a very passive way to promote a podcast.

Instead, your podcast listeners could be coming to YOUR site, because you offer valuable additional episode information there. They could be signing up to receive podcast notifications via email. They could discover links and resources about your guests. And they could be downloading relevant resources from you in exchange for an email address.

So, when recording your podcast, make sure you mention an easy to remember episode show notes link like “mypodcast.com/132”. Mention this often, for example at the start of the show, create your own mid-roll segment inviting people to visit your site, and include it again in the outro.

#4: No Digital Sharecropping

Digital sharecropping
She who does the work should benefit

In my opinion, too many authors, speakers, entrepreneurs and small businesses spread their entire online presence across 3rd party platforms. They want authority and recognition in their space. But are also conscious of the promised audience, engagement, ease of use and time savings these platforms promise.

The term "Digital Sharecropping" was first coined by Nicholas Carr

…the distribution of production into the hands of the many – but the concentration of the economic rewards into the hands of the few.

So, what we often see with new clients who come to us for help is this: They post all of their valuable intellectual capital and thought leadership content on platforms like Medium, LinkedIn or Facebook. Their videos can be found only on Youtube, their podcasts episode only on Soundcloud, iTunes or Stitcher. In other words, on platforms they themselves don’t own outright, but platforms that have a built-in audience and engagement.

In the long run, this is short-sighted

What to do instead?

I am not proposing to avoid these platforms. However, I am saying that all social and ad traffic to promote your podcast should land on your own great conversion optimized podcast home page. We recently published a video walkthrough which showcases a highly converting podcast website design pattern. It is called “The Upside Down Podcast Home Page”.

The effort (or cost) involved in creating a podcast home page and maintaining your podcast show notes are well worth it in the long run. The time spent pales in comparison to the effort of actually creating your content in the first place.

Your content should live on your own site FIRST AND FOREMOST.

Only then should it be shared from there centrally, spreading out to 3rd party platforms for social engagement. Especially if you are using Podcasting as Content Strategy.

Outward Syndication

We call this process "Outward Syndication". Many podcasters build their own system for sharing new podcast episodes once they are published.

The process we follow for our clients cross promotes their episode show notes posts gradually, across a range of platforms. These syndication channels include Youtube, Medium, Blogger, Facebook Groups, Facebook Pages, Linkedin Personal pages, LinkedIn Business Pages, Google Plus, BeBee, and other social networks.

Why do this gradually?

Before episodes are promoted on any 3rd party platforms, we want to ensure that the show notes page goes live on our own site first. And that our own episode page gets indexed by Google first. We don't want to search for our episodes online only to see our medium article pop up in the search results. Therefore we use a "rel=canonical" tag to indicate where the original article lives. This is true to Google, Bing and other search engine crawlers as well.

There are several ways to do this and to ensure our episode is indexed on our own site first. First, we can use Google's webmaster tools (AKA Google Search Console) to manually submit our episode post for indexing. This is quicker than waiting 2-3 weeks for Google's crawler to come around and visit your website. Typically we do this the day we publish to instantly be included in the search results. We discuss the importance of SEO based podcast cornerstone content strategy elsewhere on my blog, but we have seen episodes rank in the top 30 results within a week using our approach.

Delay by 2-3 weeks

So it is only after that has happened that we publish and syndicate on other platforms. Getting back to the "rel=canonical" setting when publishing on other platforms. Take Medium for example: It is very important to use their own content import tool, which uses the "rel=canonical" tag and honors the original source of the article and channels the Google rank score to that original post. So do not just copy / paste your episode show notes into a new Medium article, use their import tool.

Podcast Promotion and Syndication with StoryChief

Automating MultiChannel Syndication For Podcasts

We utilize a platform Called StoryChief, which automates the cross platform syndication of podcast and blog content. What I really like about StoryChief is that it

  • Automatically applies the "rel=canonical" settings when publishing on other platforms.
  • Supports Libsyn Podcast player widgets

I will talk about how we utilize StoryChief to automate much of our podcast episode syndication in an upcoming episode. If you'd like to find out about StoryChief in the meantime, below is a link (disclaimer – this is an affiliate link:)

StoryChief Content Syndication Platform

Content syndication for your podcast episodes

There is a one-time up-front effort in setting up multiple platforms to syndicate to, but promoting an episode to multiple platforms with built in audiences like Medium makes this worth it.

To conclude the topic of "Digital Sharecropping"

Having your own SEO optimized podcast show notes pages builds a much more valuable asset on your site, audience, and email list.

  • Would you not rather build free traffic and rank for your site? Don't overlook the value of SEO for your show notes pages. This is one of the deadly podcast marketing sins I often write about.
  • I think most marketers would agree that an email list is still the most valuable asset to build for your digital presence.

#5: Analytics & Measuring Performance

Analytics is important when using Facebook to promote a podcast
Analytics are important when using Facebook to promote a podcast

How do you measure your investment in Facebook ads?

For me the answer is this:

Success = how many people SIGN UP for your podcast or blog.

The Facebook marketing term for this is called a "conversion". It is NOT how many people clicked on your ad, nor how many more anonymous listeners you might be getting on iTunes.

Before running ad campaigns on Facebook, you get to decide the “Goal” of each ad campaign during the setup process. Simply measuring “clicks to a website” is the weakest form of available analytics. Yet this is the only goal you can use when sending traffic to iTunes or Stitcher.

Facebook ads cannot measure who subscribed to your podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. Facebook won't know if they listened to an episode after clicking on your ad. So how do you optimize or test your ads? If you are sending your ad traffic to iTunes and Stitcher as proposed by many marketers, then the only way you can tell if these ads are even working is to see if your Libsyn or Blubrry stats increased during the time you ran the ad. And of course, even then you don’t know the identity of the people who subscribed.

So don't set this as your Facebook Ad campaign goal.

A better goal is to measure “Conversions”

Facebook algorithms are more effective when optimized for conversions. When setting up an ad campaign on Facebook, you can choose "conversions" as the goal. A "conversion" is triggered every time someone goes to your podcast subscriber "thank you page", so you will need one of these on your site.

Facebook learns from who signed up and then increasingly shows your ads to the best possible and highly “converting” audience. You will need to install a “Facebook Pixel” on your site, so that actual sign-ups to your podcast email subscription list can be recorded on Facebook. Having a Facebook Pixel on your site is not complicated, there are great plugins for this. (My favorite is PixelYourSite, which makes installation and managing Facebook Pixels a snap)

Conclusion

If you use Facebook to boost or promote your podcast, don't send traffic directly to your episode pages on iTunes and Stitcher. Instead, send traffic to your own episode show notes pages. Be sure your site features a "subscribe by email widget" that redirects to a thank you page, and triggers a "conversion" on Facebook.

Podcast Advertising – a look behind the scenes of the top 3 platforms

Podcast Advertising, especially with paid ads, might not be something most podcasters consider in promoting their show and growing their subscriber base. Lots of questions arise:

  • How effective are paid podcast advertising strategies, and do they work for podcasters trying to promote their show?
  • Which ad platforms are the most effective? And which are the most affordable?

We take a look behind the scenes of 3 platforms, Google AdWords, Facebook and Podcast Ad Networks.

Using Paid Podcast Advertising Strategies

Using paid ads for promoting a podcast may not be for everyone. A lot of casual podcasters are in it just for the fun. If their show grows organically, fine. But spending money on ads is not something they'd consider.

However, when podcasting is part of a business content strategy, then paid promotions seem to make more sense.

Still, here are some common questions and objections:

  1. It is an expensive way of getting new subscribers?
  2. Measuring the effectiveness of paid ads is difficult?
  3. Your ads may not even be reaching podcast listeners?

A Podcast's Business Purpose

I find that podcasting for business is more inbound than outbound. Successful business podcasts should offer solutions, solve a prospects problems or provide training and education. Thus they are extremely effective in building a brand's authority.

But Podcasts are not effective for direct response selling to cold traffic.

If you are a business getting into podcasting as a way to sell something, stop. You might be better off advertising on existing podcasts in your niche. We cover this later in this episode.

On the other hand, if a business has a good inbound content marketing funnel, podcasts can serve as a great entry vehicle. As a business podcaster you get to talk to your ideal and relevant audience when they are in a receptive mode. Think about what people are doing when listening to their favorite podcast, the one you are appearing on. They are likely commuting, working out, going for a walk.

This listening modality is very different from interrupting an audience in the middle of browsing through their Facebook feed. So the "getting to know, like and trust" factor is huge in podcasting. And this is why Podcast Listeners are such a lucrative audience. You get to offer solutions, entertainment, education – and present your core ideas to them. But this takes the vision to invest in a longer term "inbound" strategy.

High Ad Awareness

Podcasts result in exceptionally high awareness levels for ads.

Among those who listen to or watch podcasts, just over two-thirds (67%) say they’re aware of ads in podcasts. While not an apples-to-apples comparison, the number far exceeds the 26% of smartphone users who recalled seeing an ad in a Facebook newsfeed in the last 30 days, or banner ad on the mobile web (22%)

Podcast Advertising Stats
Podcast Advertising Response Rates (source: Magid Study)

I'd like to compare several podcast advertising platforms in this episode, and point out the differences between them. Not all ad platforms are created equal.

So here’s my take on 3 platforms.

  1. Google AdWords
  2. Facebook Paid Ads
  3. Podcast Ad Networks

Podcast Advertising With Google Adwords

Podcast Advertising With Google Adwords
Google AdWords is the 800 lbs gorilla. Can it work for podcasters?

Generally speaking AdWords is expensive. So the question you’ll want to ask yourself is this: Can I afford driving traffic to my podcast at $5-$20 per click? How do you even know if your ads are reaching podcast listeners? On AdWords you cannot target podcast audiences easily.

My own view is that you need measurable results for AdWords to make sense.

For most businesses this means sending traffic to a good podcast landing page with a compelling reason to subscribe to their podcast.

Often such landing pages features an incentive for subscribing to the podcast via email, for example a guide, gift, contest or give-away. At least these landing pages should collect email addresses. Using Google Ads to send cold traffic to iTunes and hoping that people subscribe is difficult to measure, and not worth it in my opinion.

So we don’t use it except for certain corporate podcasts or non-profit podcasts in search of PR (as we are producing several). Some organizations have a PR budget, and promoting their show on AdWords seems appropriate for them.

For example, we have a non-profit organization with a podcast that has a grant from Google. We should all be so lucky! Podcast advertising using AdWords makes sense when the cost is reduced by such a grant. Plus, in their case Google stipulates that the grant money be spent this way:)

When is AdWords Appropriate?

If you are promoting high ticket products, services or programs costing hundreds or thousands of dollars, then running a podcast advertising campaign costing $5-$20 per click may appear to make sense.

But assuming that you can convert 3% of these clicks into podcast podcast listeners and subscribers, your cost per subscriber would be between $170 and $670. If you think that's expensive, so do I.

One example where AdWords could make sense is a Financial Investment and Trading Podcast. A client signing up to such a podcast and becoming a client later is worth many thousands of dollars.

But for casual podcasts with a small budget I think Adwords are hardly ever worth pursuing.

Facebook Advertising For Podcasts

Facebook Ads For Podcasts
Podcast Advertising With Facebook

Facebook is one of the most affordable paid choices for promoting a podcast. It may seem easy to simply “boost” an episode specific post on your podcast site, and then hope people listen and subscribe.

But I would not recommend this approach when first starting out. Instead, I would recommend sending traffic to your main podcast landing page that features an incentive for signing up.

Where to Send Facebook Traffic?

When you're first starting with Facebook ads, you should send these ads to your podcast home page, not your episode pages. Do not simply boost your episode shared post on Facebook. This is because boosting an individual episode show notes post seems like a quick solution but rarely converts as well as a carefully crafted visual leading to a conversion optimized page. And your ad should be designed to specifically outline the listener benefit and value proposition of your overall podcast.

Some podcasters promote on Facebook by sending traffic straight to their iTunes page. This makes no sense to me, since iTunes makes for a very poor landing page. By sending your valuable ad traffic to iTunes, you miss the opportunity to present the benefits of signing up for your podcast, and to capture an email subscriber in the process. Plus, from an SEO perspective, iTunes doesn't need traffic or social signals, but your own site does.

So let's assume you are sending ad traffic to your own podcast homepage. You therefore want to ensure your podcast home page is optimized for conversion. We have a huge guide on podcast design patterns for conversion, I suggest you check it out.

There is an exception to this rule.

If you have a lead magnet or give-away specifically for each episode, Facebook can be a great way to take advantage of that. Your visual for the Facebook ad can focus on the lead magnet give away, instead of on static or boring podcast art. Your Facebook episode specific ads should make it clear that there is a "must have" lead magnet associated with the ad.

The more your "lead magnet" is aligned with the topic of the episode, the better the conversion rates will be.

Targeting Podcast Listeners On Facebook

As I mentioned, targeting podcast listeners on Facebook can be tricky. Here is our 5 step process for creating custom Facebook audiences that are more likely to be podcast listeners. You can use this to drive Facebook traffic to your podcast's home page. By the way this is an example of an episode specific lead magnet:

Podcast Advertising and targeting on Facebook

Using Facebook Paid Ads For Contests

A popular and effective way to gain podcast subscribers is by running a contest or give-away on Facebook. This used to be a popular podcast launch strategy. Contests were typically set up to ask for an iTunes review in exchange for entering the contest. However, the iTunes algorithms have changed since then. Reviews no longer play as much of a role in driving a podcast into the New and Noteworthy section.

That said, contests can work for subscriber growth even after the initial launch period. The benefit here is that people entering your contest are providing their email address, and you can make it clear that by entering the contest your listeners are signing up for email notifications when new episodes launch.

The prize for a contest does not need to be anything super expensive.

But it should be aligned with the topic of the show. It is much more important that the prize is relevant. Take a Customer Experience podcast for example. Rather than giving away an iPad or some other expensive gadget, consider giving away tickets to the premiere Customer Experience Conference that year. If you were to give away an iPad you would get tons of meaningless content entries of people just fishing for an electronic gadget. But it you are giving away conference tickets, you can be sure that people entering your contest are interested in your topic, and thus ideal podcast subscribers.

Here are some good Facebook Contest Resources.

  • Heyo – Beautiful and easy to set up, including a free trial and affordable monthly rate after that.
  • Wishpond – Lots of contest templates to choose from. Also includes a free trial.
  • Shortstack – A platform for contests and quizzes. More options and a greater learning curve.
  • Agora Pulse – Most affordable platform, and ROI focused.

For a more complete review of Facebook Contest platforms, check out this in-depth review by Venture Harbor.

Additional Ways To Use Facebook for Podcast Advertising

While Facebook advertising is affordable and effective, it is also a pretty vast topic, requiring lots of expertise. We will do a deep dive into this in a future episode. Here are just some additional ideas on utilizing the Facebook ads platform.

  • Facebook Messenger bots to invite people to subscribe or leave a review. These messenger bots result in you acquiring leads with emails.
  • Installing Facebook Pixels on your site and re-targeting your site visitors to subscribe.
  • Running Facebook ads to social share gates, using our favorite social share gate tool called "GoViral". This saves you from having to create a landing page, and still results in people sharing your podcast pages with their Facebook audience in order to "unlock" your lead magnet offer.

If you have not done so before, getting started properly with Facebook ads can be intimidating, so consider taking a Facebook ads course or hiring someone experienced to help you get started.

Podcast Ad Networks

Podcast Ad Networks

With both AdWords and Facebook you will mostly be advertising to non-podcast listeners. It is difficult to target podcast listeners only on Facebook, and next to impossible on Google.

In-podcast advertising networks are so effective because by default, your entire audience consists of podcast listeners.

One great way to get new listeners is to advertise on other existing podcasts in your niche. Most podcasters only think of podcast advertising networks as something to help them monetize their own show. But placing an ad inside one of the most popular podcasts in your niche can be super effective. According to Midroll, 61% of podcast listeners have taken action and purchased or signed up for something from such podcast ads.

The real benefit of this approach is the fact that you are advertising on your medium. If people are listening to your ads, that means they are podcast subscribers already. It is much easier to convince them to check out your show, than to show your Facebook or AdWords content to people who may not even listen to podcasts at all.

So how much does this cost?

Here is some information from Midroll, by far the best known podcast advertising network.

All Midroll podcast ads are priced on a cost-per-thousand downloads model, or CPM. For instance, with a $25 CPM, a spot on a show with 10,000 downloads per episode costs $250; with 100,000 downloads, it’s $2500.

So let’s do the math. If your ad is highly relevant to the audience of the podcast you place your ad into, and assuming 3% of listeners take action and subscribe to your show, your cost per new listener would be $0.83. If only 1% of listeners take action, then it would be $2.50 per subscriber.

On the surface, these numbers compare very favorably to advertising on Facebook or AdWords. However, there is a rub: Podcast networks charge per download, and the number of downloads do not equal the number of listens. And in order for your in-podcast midroll ads to work, you need people to listen, right? How many downloads are actually listened to depends greatly on the type of podcast. A daily news podcast might have a much lower download to listen ration vs. a podcast with a loyal fan base. Just something to keep in mind.

Midroll

  • Midroll is the largest player in this field, with an inventory of over 300 podcasts, and a focus of matching podcasters with
  • Here is a link to Midroll’s metrics, demographics and pricing, everything you need to know to advertise your own show on one of the best known podcast ad networks.

Authentic

Archer Avenue

  • Archer Avenue works with you to ensure your ads are placed only on the shows you are interested in. They can also help you design an audio ad matching the style of the show you would be advertising on.

Advertise Cast

  • Advertise Cast has an interesting tool to help you find podcasts to advertise on, as well as predict the total spend of your campaign. Look for the "filter" tool in the left sidebar of their site. You can set the Cost Per Thousand (CPM) downloads to display podcasts that match your budget, and then proceed to select shows that would be a good fit.

Podgrid

  • Podgrid focuses on small to medium sized shows, and go the extra mile to match you with the best podcasts to advertise on.
  • Because they are small, they work to match your budget. Thus I think they are a good choice if you want to experiment with a limited budget.

Podcast One

  • Podcast One is a large network with 200 shows and "400 million impressions" according to their page.
  • They claim to be able to offer metrics on spots actually being heard, instead of using downloads. This is done through "3rd party verification". I do no know to what extent this increases their pricing, something you might wish to ask when reaching out to them,

How To Get Started With Advertising on Podcast Ad Networks

If placing ads on podcast networks seems intimidating, there is a good article on Adopter Media explaining podcast advertising rates and how they work. It answers the most common questions about how costs are determined and common pricing approaches.

In order to figure out if this will work for your podcast and your budget, I would suggest the following: Study each podcast network website listed above. Remember that the best outcome results from being aligned with the show you are advertising on.

  • Make a list of podcasts that would suit your niche and messaging.
  • Set a budget you would be comfortable with for 1/2 year.
  • Contact each network through their online form and describe what you are looking for.
  • If your budget is limited, try the Podgrid network first.

All of the podcast networks are very customer friendly. They offer consulting sessions to help you get started, and I'd suggest phone or Zoom meetings with each one to get a sense of how they work and how well aligned you are with their stable of available podcasts.

Conclusion

All in all, I think I can summarize it like this.

  1. Google Adwords is appropriate only in rare circumstances. If your podcast is associated with a "big ticket item" business, or if you have a grant:)
  2. Facebook is the most versatile podcast advertising platform simply because it's targeting flexibility and relative affordability.
  3. Podcast Ad Networks are the most effective way to get to existing podcast listeners, but require a decent budget.

Does your marketing plan for 2012 involve mobile advertising? If not, perhaps it should.

Website Magazine just published some predictions of how mobile marketing will be an increasingly big factor in advertising. The most interesting opportunities for brands come from the closer integration between mobile devices and everything else electronic. For example, you may have started to notice TV ads that incorporate QR codes  where smartphone users scan the QR codes to get more information. Or brands that offer their own mobile app with built in loyalty programs where users can unlock deals by scanning QR codes, rewards and coupons, or by using their mobile device to unlock GPS based deals when visiting the store.

As the New Year begins, resolutions and predictions are out in full-force, and many observers are expecting the biggest year yet for mobile advertising. Below are a few predictions from global content delivery network Mirror Image Internet that may help your online and/or mobile advertising plans.

    • Advertisers will use HyLoMo (hyper-local mobile) technology to offer consumers more engaging advertising options. The advertising options will be directly relevant to consumers, based on device type and user behavior, and will include interactive coupons and games.
    • Interactive TVs will be an important part of an advertiser’s marketing strategy. Because consumers will have the ability to make purchases and interact with ads from their living rooms.
    • Mobile devices like smartphones and tablets will interact more with home devices. And, therefore, will provide advertisers with new avenues to promote and sell their services. This will result in a shift of marketing dollars to online mediums because advertisers will rely on connected devices to reach target audiences.
    • More consumers will use smart devices in real-time to find deals while they’re out shopping. This will result in advertisers taking advantage of geolocation detection to reach customers closer to the point of purchase. This will directly impact the way marketers and brick-and-mortar stores interact with consumers. 
    • The growth of online videos will put a strain on websites. According to ComScore, U.S. Internet users watched an average of 20.5 hours of video online in November 2011, a total of 40.9 billion videos – more than 20 billion more videos than in November 2010. With the growth of this number in 2012, there will be an increased strain on websites, which will lead TV networks and video providers to look for new services that can deliver rich content faster and remain competitive.

According to an attitudinal research study completed by Resonate Research, 18-34 year olds purchasing behaviors are influenced by both the products value, the aspirational aspect of a product’s brand message, and also by it’s “cool” factor.

From the press release:

This group is more passionate about social issues like energy (36% more than the 35 plus online population), climate change (48% more) and animal rights (24% more). However, in general they are 15% – 25% less likely to make purchase decisions based on their issues of importance. Instead they look to products for external validation, meaning they buy products that convey and reward their success and personal achievement. When compared to the 35 plus online population, 18 – 34 year olds are more likely to purchase based on the following brand attributes: innovation, looks, popularity and prestige. In fact, they are five times more likely than their elders to purchase a product that is viewed as prestigious, and over twice as likely to buy a popular product or a product that is aesthetically appealing.

Read more

It has been fascinating watching the tentative forays of broadcast networks coming to grips with putting TV shows online.

Many Gen-Yers are taking the trend towards placing all TV content online for granted, and perhaps in the larger strategic sense it makes perfect sense for advertising industry and broadcasters to team up in order to take advantage of the Internets capacity to deliver more targeted advertising content. However, robust business models for incorporating profile driven advertising for TV shows do not really exist yet, and the jury is still out on if this translates into buyer behavior that would ultimately generate more revenue. In the meantime we are witnessing a retrenchment of sorts:

According to an article in the NY times today, AT&T, Comcast, DirecTV, Time Warner Cable and Verizon are among the companies exploring a subscribers-only approach to online TV.

Broadcasters “went out and did deals to put content on broadband without a whole lot of thought about the long-term financial model,” said Jeffrey L. Bewkes, chief executive of Time Warner and a principal supporter of the new subscriber-only Web video plan. “If people aren’t subscribing to the programming, you probably shouldn’t put it online, because then half of the financial support goes away. That isn’t good. It hasn’t been good for the newspaper industry.”

Ingonish Gravestone at Sunset

Image by JB Photo via Flickr

While a younger web-savy generation is thinking about concepts like trading their google searches and twitter activity to advertisers, in exchange for fewer and more targeted ads, the mechanics for this do not exist yet, and the aggregation platforms (like HULU and Boxee) that could deliver such business models are viewed with deep suspicion by network executives.

A friend today reminded my that old business models are easily destroyed, and die far more quickly than new and successful ones are born.

  • Some Online Shows Could Go Subscription-Only (nytimes.com)

Here is a very interesting idea of using crowd sourcing concepts, combined with social media tools,  to engage, organize and motivate people to actually accomplish something positive and altruistic, by helping them move beyond “just talk” or “joining groups”, and by enabling and empowering them into action in a novel way.

I think that if successful, any tools that in large daunting projects help break down and reduce the scope into doable chunks, would have much wider applications in our lives both at home and at work.

I think we could all use help in moving forward with the meta projects in our life.

Ifranworldfounders

Marketing veteran Cindy Gallop and software developer Wendell Davis are on a quest to make the world a better place, with a crowdsourcing project to motivate people to do big things by taking small bites. Their theory: Small, good intentions can bring about great leaps.

Gallop is the former global marketing chief and U.S. chairman for the BBH marketing behemoth that ran campaigns for Levi’s, Axe Body Spray and other brands. She’s joining with former Splice and Zooomr CEO Davis (pictured) to accomplish this lofty task one piece at a time. They’ll encourage corporations to work with the customers they seek, as the community tackles a user-generated database of large and small causes.

Their unlaunched site, IfWeRantheWorld.com, should succeed in giving online activism some sorely-needed teeth. Rather than raising awareness, the site is set up to convert intent into action, to get things done. As a side effect, it could reinvent advertising as a transparent interaction between corporations and individuals.

“The single largest pool of untapped resource in this world is human good intentions that never translate into action,” said Gallop, who founded the company with Davis two years ago after digital guru Esther Dyson introduced them. Gallop says current do-gooder networks make it too hard to find achievable, concrete tasks that fit one’s skill set, time and budget — and that offer instant gratification.

“For a large amount of the world, doing good is fundamentally very, very boring,” explained Gallop. “If you go to the homepage of something like DoSomething.org, or any one of the many [like it], there is an instant yawn factor -– ‘I know this is really good stuff, I should be doing it, but I’m half asleep already.”

“There is no Google of action,” she added.

IfWeRantheWorld.com breaks even the largest goodwill projects (“feed Darfur”) down into discrete tasks, which it distributes to members through a commercially supported, socially networked environment. When people have the urge to act on something that irritates them about the world, they can actually do something. Their plan (more below) not only impressed us, but also Dyson, who said it will create “a liquidity of goodness.” Former Google executive Katie Jacobs Stanton, who joined the Obama administration as “director of citizen participation,” heard about the plan from Gallop at the TED conference last month.

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