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The Conference App System is a complete conference app package and includes front and back-end features that make it an invaluable mobile companion to large conferences, expos and events. Watch the demo video or explore the system’s features in more detail on our special conference app system portal site.

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Top Ranked iPad App in the business category!

Our “Embracing Change” app made it to #2 yesterday and holds the position today. We gifted it to the world for Valentine’s day.

top ranked ipad app

So take advantage of a very cool, top ranked iPad app, created with the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite that you will help you embrace change whenever you need it.

Please note: This app was replaced in early 2018

This app had a great 6-year run since it’s launch in 2012. Nonetheless, we’ve been focused on creating great universal web experiences and have launched other resources to take the app’s place.

We’ve recently launched a brand new site with both free and paid in-depth training courses on creating positive change, at home, at work, and in your communities. So please visit our new site at positivechange.training:

 

While it may seem like a good idea to just turn your eBook or pdf into an app with minimal tweaking, think again.

True, it can be a faster and cheaper way to get into the app store and/or onto your customer’s Newstand shelf (we talked about this in Put Yourself on the Shelf), but there’s a possible cost associated with such an approach.  Of course it depends on your objective for being in the app store, but if high visibility and sustainability are important to you,  then quality matters.

As Adage.com reports “Magazine and newspaper apps’ quality seems to be the most important factor in their success with consumers, according to the first annual “The State of the App” report from McPheters & Company’s iMonitor service, drawing on iMonitor’s evaluations of 3,000 apps from publishers around the world.

Findings from our Polymash survey of mobile usage among professionals validate the same response:  quality comes out on top of what users value most in apps.

Moreover, iPad owners are a pretty sophisticated and tech saavy bunch which translates into high expectations when it comes to the apps they choose to download.  These customers naturally expect to see a certain level of design elegance rub off when you move your content to an iPad.  If they don’t, they are likely to be disappointed and may never come back.

Apple Store Approval does not Necessarily = A Quality App

It is surprising, given Apple’s standards, that apps amounting to little more than conversions or a wrapper with a bunch of files that looks no more sophisticated than the contents of a file folder manage to slip through the app review process.

So just because you made it through Apple’s gatekeepers doesn’t mean your app will satisfy the expectations of tablet or smart phone users.

Quality Content Deserves Quality Design

Besides, if you have high quality content why not present it in a high quality way?

There was a time when great words on a page were enough to reach people.  Yet in today’s fast paced world with short attention spans words alone may not be enough to get your message across and keep people coming back for more.

The iOS devices showed us communication and design are inextricably linked.

How are you leveraging the best of the communication tools and technologies available today to communicate in a way that maximizes the impact of your ideas and your words?

For a free consultation on how you can transform you rcontent into an exceptional experience on mobile devices and take your place in the app marketplace contact us.

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A telling story on PBS Newshour on October 25 about the impacts of media on young children, and of special interest,  the impact of mobile devices – smartphones and iPads – on very young children. How are they engaging, is it good or bad, and is the take-up equal?

The news report was based on a study in the USA by Common Sense Media, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families.  Some of the findings include:

Key Trends

Exposure to computers and mobile devices:

  • 2-4 year olds: 12% use a computer daily
  • 0-8 year olds: 50%  have access to a mobile device

App gap – digital divide

  • Lower income families: 14% have downloaded apps
  • Higher income families: 47%  have downloaded apps

#1 category of iPhone apps now is for preschoolers. Read more

App Advice Review of Wild Dolphins iPad AppThrilled with AppAdvice’s coverage of our Wild Dolphins app!

If you took your family out to see Dolphin Tale in theaters this weekend, or if you are simply interested in the wonderful world of marine mammals, you have to check out Wild Dolphins for iPad. It’s a new educational app by Polymash, our latest AppAdvice Daily podcast sponsor, that tells the story behind Winter, a dolphin who gets caught in a crab trap near Florida, and her miraculous recovery.

We are loving the awesome review Tyler Tschida wrote on AppAdvice! And we appreciate picking up the true theme and purpose of the app, which is to help protect dolphins in the wild.

But Wild Dolphins isn’t just about Winter. The app also features stories about how the team at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute saved the lives of other dolphins like Rio, Mono, and Hiho.

Polymash Inc. today introduces the FilmOneFest app for iPad. The FilmOneFest app is a collection of one-minute films from filmmakers all around the world with supporting stories, artists’ statements and interviews. The app gives visibility and voice to film makers across the world, enabling their talent to serve and inspire others to question, experiment, explore, laugh, cry, and unite us in our common humanity in this one-minute format.

[button link=”http://prmac.com/release-id-27475.htm” type=”icon” icon=”notice”]Read the Full PR Mac Press Release[/button]

We are pleased to announce that our free FilmOneFest iPad app is now available on the iTunes iPad app store.

FilmOneFest is a celebration of one-minute films as an art form, also a film festival held in Atlantic Highlands, NJ, and the FilmOneFest iPad app is a collection of one-minute films from filmmakers all around the world with supporting stories, artists’ statements, and interviews. To find out more:

[button link=”https://polymash.com/film-one-fest-ipad-app/” type=”icon” icon=”notice”]Visit the FilmOneFest Home Page[/button]

Some context about risk-taking

The press release (full text here) has been met with a lot of buzz on Twitter and a number of review sites.

[button size=’small’ color=’black’ link=’http://www.polymash.com/app/the-crankamacallit-ipad-apps-for-kids/’]Visit the Crankamcallit Home Page[/button]

At Polymash we feel the Crankamacallit is interactive story-telling with a difference, and I wanted to provide a little context as to why and elaborate a bit more on the following part of the release:

This iPad app for kids takes some risks that set it apart from most children’s stories. The developer took a page out of game design by utilizing a first person perspective in interactivity, animation and illustration. Interactive elements are intentionally not highlighted nor easy to find. User testing feedback revealed kids “get it” and show their parents the functionality, not the other way around. Another risk was to use the recently released Adobe CS5.5 Digital Publishing Suite platform for a children’s book, and to extend its core functions with HTML5 and JavaScript coding. The developer participated in the alpha and beta testing for Adobe beginning in the summer of 2010, and with this app shows that the platform can be used for much more than just the digital magazines it was created for.

The buzz about iPad usability

I  come from a corporate IT background in user experience and usability engineering. And recent buzz complains about the lack of usability  standards on the iPad (based on a report by the Nielsen Norman Group, an authority in the field) Here is an example on the Huffington Post referring to this study. They point out that because of a lack of standard user interfaces for the Pad, interactive elements and the overall user experience is  not always obvious and predictable.

So, can “lack of usability standards” ever be a good thing?

iPad app for kids - crankamacallitWhile this lack may be a frustration to grown ups, our own usability studies have shown that for kids this has not been an issue.

Why? My theory is that unlike grown-ups, kid’s egos are not as involved or hurt by having to explore and hunt for functionality, and they delight in figuring it out. We’ve often witnessed grown ups pick up an iPad for the first time with a sense of trepidation and fear of not quite knowing how to use it, but kids immediately start to experiment and play. And I think as grown ups start to understand the device, they too delight in their “discoveries”.  To me, this sense of discovery creates much deeper engagement, and the many brilliant app designs unencumbered by any usability standards illustrate the magic of the iPad.

So I for one do not necessarily look forward to seeing universal iPad usability standards develop. So unlike many kid’s apps we see, for our interactive children’s story we have intentionally not been too obvious about brightly highlighting interactive regions, providing instructions or hints. Our testing with kids proved that they “get it” and are able to show functionality of the app to their parents, not the other way around.

Here’s a grown up’s (unsolicited) review on iTunes that illustrates the point:

“The first time I went through this book on my iPad I missed 90% of it and I thought, “well, this is pretty lame”. Then my 3 year old daughter got ahold of it and showed me what was possible. Even without having seen the rest of it, what I did see initially was visually stunning. The rest of it just made it worth the $5. It’s not a book of puzzles, it’s a book that tells a story (obviously), and invites you to explore the world created so cleverly by the graphic artist. Don’t leave a single stone unturned when you go through the book, or, give it to your 3 year old and sit back and be amazed. “

An interactive children’s story about building an imaginary vehicle, “The Crankamacallit” is filled with stunning interactive animation and surprising sounds.

Using playful, rhythmic language and rhyme “The Crankamacallit” draws the user into the fantastic 3D world of an inventor’s workshop.

A great iPad app for kids, who  love all the unpredictable moving parts of “The Crankamacallit”. In an adventurous tale for the picture book crowd, 3-8 year olds (and their parents!) will be mesmerized by the step-by-step process of the Crankamacallit’s creation and become active participants in the story by using the many interactive features, making unexpected discoveries, exploring 360-degree panoramas, using the hidden drawing tool and more.

Part poem, part story, this rhythmic 3D fantasy was written by Mimi Cross, animated by Juergen Berkessel and narrated by acclaimed singer songwriter Robert Burke Warren, aka “Uncle Rock”.Listeners will laugh out loud at the nuances of Warren’s performance.

Features

  • Unique 3D artwork and unusual illustrations
  • Music and mechanical sounds
  • Animation and video
  • 360 degree panoramas
  • 3D interactive rotational objects
  • Pan and zoom chart
  • A hidden picture scratch off scene
  • Drawing widget
  • “Secret” hotspots

Come visit our gallery to get a taste, check out the developing posts, and watch out for a number of related announcements in the coming days.

Today I will build you a Crankamacallit

With pieces and parts from my carpenter’s kit.

With buttons and levers and yes, of course—CRANKS!

With switches and gears and an old baseball mitt.