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How Much Does It Cost To Develop an App in 2015?

We hear this question all the time: How Much Does It Cost To Develop an App?

Compared to client expectations about app development costs from three years ago, there is increasing evidence that apps are not “cheap” to develop. Perhaps this is in part due to the fact that most apps are expected to be cloud connected and social.

Asking “How much does an app cost to develop” is much like asking “how much does it cost to build a house”, there is no definitive or easy answer.

Great Expectations

But any expectations around a mobile app costing only a few thousand dollars, and being easier easier to build than a web site, have largely disappeared. For those interested in factors contributing to application build costs, this article on formotus.com provides a good read and food for thought.

So What Stats Are there?

 
A survey of IT professionals by AnyPresence, a backend-as-a-service company, asked about the initial cost of developing a typical mobile application. Over half reported spending more than three months and over $50,000 developing a typical app. Very nearly a quarter reported spending over $100,000.
Read full story on www.formotus.com: Cost To Develop an App

Cost To Develop an App

For some additional resources and recent app cost calculators, see the following links:

KinveyKinvey’s App Cost Estimatorhttp://www.kinvey.com/app-cost-estimator
John RaineyHow much does it cost to develop an app?http://www.accella.net/how-much-will-my-mobile-app-cost-to-create/
Carter, Bluecloud SolutionsHow Much Will my Mobile App Cost to Create?http://www.bluecloudsolutions.com/blog/cost-develop-app/
By Aaron Maxwell, MashableIs Developing a Mobile App Worth the Cost?http://mashable.com/2011/02/24/mobile-app-dev-cost/

In Pounds Sterling:

This post provided some very detailed estimates by the CTO of 5App and his conclusion:

It’s safe to assume that using traditional development techniques to create a cross-platform enterprise app won’t come in under £100K.

Are We Asking the Right Questions About Apple’s iBooks Push?

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In the last week or so, the news have been full of stores about the impact of Apple’s announcement of iBooks and iBooks authoring software. Fastcompany just posted an interesting article about the many questions Apple’s entry into this space raises. While not providing any answers, sometimes it is more important to ask the right questions:

  • Industry-standard e-book formats or proprietary, protected files?
  • Android or iOS?
  • Cloud-hosted files or local storage?
  • Standalone apps or “Newsstand”?
  • Creator-friendly terms or restrictive EULA?
  • Format integrity or media evolution?

Apple’s iBooks Push Raises 6 Big Questions About The Future Of E-Publishing (via FastCompany)
Last week, Apple made headlines with iBooks 2.0 and iBooks Author, the company’s next big moves into textbooks and self-publishing. When players like Apple go wading into the marketplace with game-changing announcements, there’s a tendency to believe that all the outstanding uncertainties have been resolved.

But in the fast-evolving e-book space, that’s far from true. Apple, Amazon, Google, and the various corporate content owners are huge and influential, but when they are all battling each other over fundamentals of the market, it’s consumers, creators, and publishers who have control.

[button link=”http://www.fastcompany.com/1812673/apple-s-big-epublishing-moves-highlight-uncertainties-in-the-market/” color=”silver”] Read the Full article at fastcompany.com[/button]

Technorati Tags: ipad, iOS, Android, tablets, digital publishing

Get Yourself on the Shelf

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A simple yet powerful innovation in iOS 5 – the introduction of Newsstand – is rapidly changing the way people buy and read magazines and other periodical and subscription based content.

But the opportunity created isn’t just for those with traditional publications.

If you are a content owner of any kind – author, blogger, information product owner, etc. – this may well be your entry point in the app store.

[box] Wired.com reported this statement from a press release by Ryan Marquis, Pixel Mags founder and COO: “We quickly started to realize just how big of an impact Apple Newsstand was having on our business when on the morning after launch, I received a phone call from our server company wondering if we were under attack,” said Ryan Marquis, PixelMags’ founder and COO, in a company’s press release.

With the release of Newsstand came an incredible surge in subscriptions to digital magazines.  Another Wired.com article sites examples from Conde Nast’s surge of  268 percent spike to  PixelMags reported 1,150 percent growth increase in the first week after Newsstand and iOS 5 debuted on Oct. 12th.  The article goes on to say: “Without a doubt, Newsstand increases the visibility of subscription-based magazine and newspaper apps, which often get buried under the onslaught of games, social media and photo apps that tend to dominate the App Store’s charts.”[/box]

And that is exactly why this is a significant development for content owners.

Don’t just think magazine, think about the wonderful content you deliver to your customers on your websites, blogs, and in your information products.  Apps based on great content, not flashy interactivity are a whole new delivery channel.  Combine elegant design with your content and package it as an app and you deliver a superior experience of your content.  Content intensive apps now have a place because they have a context end users can understand. Read more

A year is a very long time in publishing

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Here is a brief section of an interview by AnnArbor.com with Borders CEO Mike Edwards about the ongoing bankruptcy, and his surprised reaction to how fast e-books and tablets have impacted the publishing industry.

AnnArbor.com: With e-books, how fast do you see the transition occurring? Are you surprised by how fast it’s occurring already?

Edwards:

Yes. I joined the company just a little over a year and a half ago. When I joined, e-books were less than 1 percent of the market. The Kindle was out but it didn’t have the traction. The Nook had just been released. The Apple product wasn’t even on the market.

Within a year it went from 1 percent to almost 10 to 11 percent of the total publishing sales. That is a radical transformation. And that comes at the expense of physical books.

That profound impact on the retail traffic puts a lot of pressure on not just our bookstore, but all bookstores. So I was surprised to see it move that fast. I don’t anticipate it slowing down any time soon.

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Axiom News features Polymash App

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We are extremely pleased that Axiom News has just released an article on our recently released “Embracing Change” app. Below a brief excerpt, to read the full article follow this link.

[box]Last year, Stratton-Berkessel published the book Appreciative Inquiry for Collaborative Solutions: 21 Strength-Based Workshops. Since then she became intrigued by the use of tablets like the iPad to consume content. She says she started to see some business applications come out for tablet devices, and thought about how great it would be to turn one of her workshops into an app. [/box]

Alternatives to Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite

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The tablet market is continuing to exhibit astonishing growth (17 billion in revenue forecasted for mobile applications in 2011 – source: Gartner)

It is not surprising that more platforms for digital publishing and porting content onto the tablet format are cropping up.

At this week’s O’Reilly Tools of Change for Publishing conference , one of the more intriguing announcements comes from a French company that has created a digital publishing platform which will go live in March.

From their press release today:

Aquafadas Digital Publishing Platform offers key advantages in digital publishing:

  • It enables designers to create well-designed digital content
    quickly through easy-to-use plugins for Adobe® InDesign® and
    QuarkXPress® — no coding required
  • Publications can be based on PDF or XML , enhanced by picture galleries, slide shows, videos, and sound
  • Aquafadas ’s Solution makes it easy to deploy digital publications
    to multiple devices, such as tablets and smartphones, and to multiple
    operating systems, such as iOS® and Android™ — simultaneously
  • Publications can be published as interactive PDF, custom Apps, and
    in an unique, XML-based format that supports text reflow while
    maintaining the publication’s design

Unlike other approaches Aquafadas’ provides a complete and
cost-effective end-to-end solution for digital publishing from creation
to delivery.

Leading corporate and professional publishers such as Galleries
Lafayette, Reader’s Digest, and Carlsen Verlag already selected
Aquafadas’ solution as their digital publishing tool of choice.

We will post a follow up once the pricing model becomes available.

AUTO BILD für iPad !

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Is it just me, or does it seem that European magazines are way more active in developing iPad and tablet digital publications?

Recently there have been a slew of digital magazines released in Europe, and Axel Springer Verlag is just the latest examples of this. It would also appear to me that the pricing and subscription models are more consumer friendly in the EU compared to the US, where publishers seem determined to set an example and train tablet users to expect high pricing models for Magazine Content.

So which is the better strategy? Attracting loyal readership with low pricing and making money through sales volume is one way, or hold out for higher pricing and risk fewer readers of the digital editions?

While I think the production costs for digital content may seem high to publishers initially, I feel the exponential growth of the tablet market on multiple platforms is being ignored in the US approach. Production costs may be high, but ultimately the distribution costs are not when scaling to potentially millions of readers. To me the scalability of the digital platforms are the real differentiation to print, where each additional copy costs extra ink, paper, packaging, transportation, distribution, warehousing, inventory and waste copies.

So I guess personally I come down on the side of lower pricing and future volume, even if this initially means subsidizing the effort slightly. Plus, establishing and automating digital publishing work flows is an experience best had in the beginning of the upcoming rush to tablet publishing.

What do you think?

Samsung and WoodWing announce cooperation for GALAXY Tab

The first results of the cooperation will be demonstrated to the public during the IFRA Expo in Hamburg, Germany, held on October 4 – 6, 2010.

Samsung, a global leader in mobile technology, and WoodWing Software, a supplier of innovative cross-media publishing solutions, today announced a cooperation to bring digital publications to Samsung’s brand-new smart media device, the GALAXY Tab.

GALAXY Tab
Available to consumers in Europe starting in October 2010, and soon available in the United States and Asia, the GALAXY Tab has a large 7-inch TFT display, for an exciting mobile viewing experience. Weighing in at only 380g, it includes 16GB or 32GB of internal storage and 32GB microSD expansion. The GALAXY Tab features a TouchWiz 3.0 user interface, WiFi, GPS, rear- and front-facing cameras and also acts as a mobile phone. In addition, as an Android powered device, the GALAXY Tab provides access to numerous applications from Android Market.

Things are speeding up in the tablet publishing space, as expected.

Tools like Woodwing will become increasingly important, because they can support authoring content once and then distributing it across multiple tablet devices with multiple operating systems.

I believe the same will be true for content support agencies and service providers that can help clients navigate publishing to many app market places.

For a full description of Woodwing’s approach click through to the president release.