5 Reasons NOT to Promote Your Podcast on Facebook

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If you have a podcast, then one of your top priorities will be to increase your audience size. After all, if you create a podcast to which no one listens, does it even matter? So at first glance, you may think that running Facebook Ads would be a good vehicle to promote your podcast and help increase your listening numbers and subscribers. After all, Facebook will allow you to finely target your audience and do it in a very cost effective way.

My point with this post is not so much to argue that Facebook is inherently a bad platform to  advertise podcasts on, but rather to point out that there is a better way to do it than most marketers recommend. There have been a slew of recent posts on how to best advertise podcasts on Facebook, and I fundamentally disagree with the premise of these posts. Here is why:

So what’s the problem with using Facebook Ads to promote your podcast?

The issue has to do with where to send traffic once someone clicks on your ad.

So many marketers recommend promoting Facebook episodes by directly linking to the iTunes or Android episode pages.

  • They argue this is better than sending people to a show notes page on your own site
  • In fact, many of these posts argue that you don’t need show notes pages at all, and can save the time and effort
  • They argue that iTunes and Stitcher is after all where you want people to go to subscribe to your show
  • They advise that this is the best way to capture people on mobile devices, by targeting an iOS audience for the direct link to the iTunes episode, and by targeting Android audience and sending them to the Stitcher episode link

I fundamentally disagree with this for the following 5 reasons:

#1:  It Costs Too Much

Sure, your ads may result in getting more subscribers to your podcast on iTunes and Stitcher, but Facebook ads should have a better goal than just to add listeners to your podcast. And the cost per new listener is usually quite high. Think of it this way, in terms of analytics: “Cost per anonymous listener” IS NOT THE SAME THING AS “Cost per qualified lead or email subscriber”. You could be adding leads for your business, building your email list, increase the rank and traffic for your site, and building a digital asset for your brand.

Instead, you could be getting greater value and ROI from your facebook ads by focusing on lead generation and list growth instead of on just getting more listeners.

#2:  iTunes and Google Play Do Not Need More Traffic

promote-your-podcast-on-itunesYou are paying for traffic that you are sending to iTunes and Google Play Music.

Really?

Instead, your own site could be benefitting from greater traffic, rank and authority.

#3:  Blind Dates

promote your podcast with a blind dateiTunes and Google play traffic may slightly increase your subscriber and listener stats at Libsyn or Blubrry. Of course this cannot truly be measured, since Facebook won’t know how many listeners actually subscribed to your show on those platforms.

More importantly, you don’t know whose these listeners are. Since you are not capturing their email address, you have much less of a chance to engage with them, even if they are big fans of your show. If you don’t manage to send them to your website and show pages, you are essentially going on blind dates – without ever even asking for a name.

You are essentially going on blind dates – without ever even asking for a name

Instead, your podcast listeners could be coming to YOUR site, because you offer valuable additional episode information there. They could be signing up to receive podcast notifications via email, or finding links and resources about your guests, and downloading these resources from you in exchange for an email address.

#4:  No Digital Sharecropping

no sharecorpping in promoting your podcastIn my opinion, too many authors, speakers, entrepreneurs and small businesses spread their entire online presence across 3rd party platforms. They want authority  and recognition in their space, but are also conscious of the promised audience, engagement, ease of use and time savings these platforms promise.

They post all of their valuable intellectual capital and thought content on platforms like Medium, LinkedIn or Facebook instant articles. Their videos exist only on Youtube, their podcasts episode only on Soundcloud, iTunes or Stitcher. In other words on platforms they don’t themselves own outright, but platforms that have a built-in audience and engagement.

In the long run, this is short-sighted

What to do instead? I am not proposing to avoid these platforms. However, I am saying that the content should live on your own site FIRST AND FOREMOST, and then be shared from there centrally, spreading out to 3rd party platforms for social engagement. The effort involved in creating and maintaining your own podcast show notes are well worth it in the long run, and pales in comparison to the effort of actually creating your content in the first place. You need to build system for sharing from this central platform only once – the week to week effort of recording episodes and publishing show notes for them adds up only gradually, and much of the process and subsequent syndication of your content can be automated.

For our clients we specialize on automation of the entire podcast production and publishing workflow, including automatically syndicating your episode content onto many other platforms. The content calendar tools and automation processes we use for this is the topic of another upcoming post, feel free to subscribe to our blog to learn more.

In short, having your own podcast show notes pages allow you to build a much more valuable asset in your site, audience and email list. Would you not rather have traffic and rank for your own site? Would you not rather earn organic search traffic over time? And I think most marketers would agree that email lists are still the most valuable asset to build for your digital presence.

#5 : Analytics & Measuring Performance

How do you measure your investment in Facebook ads? For me the answer is by how many people SIGN UP for your podcast or blog, NOT by how many more listeners you might be getting on iTunes

Before running ad campaigns on Facebook, you get to decide the “Goal” of each ad campaign during the setup process. Simply measuring “clicks to a website” is the weakest form of available analytics, yet this is the only goal you can use when sending traffic to iTunes or Stitcher.

Facebook cannot measure who subscribed to your podcast on iTunes or Stitcher, or even if they listened to an episode after clicking on your ad. So how do you optimize or test your ads? If you are sending your ad traffic to iTunes and Stitcher as proposed by many marketers, then the only way you can tell if these ads are even working is to see if your Libsyn or Blubrry stats increased during the time you ran the ad. And of course, even then you don’t know the identity of the people who subscribed.

promote your podcast and know your numbers

A recent marketing webinar from SharpSpring pointed out that focus on conversion rate was by far the most important metric to measure.

A better goals is to measure “Conversions”, and Facebook algorithms are more effective in showing your ads to the best possible and highly “converting” audience. However, for this you need to install a “Facebook Pixel” on your own site, so that actual sign ups to your podcast email subscription list can be recorded by Facebook. Having a Facebook Pixel on your site is not complicated, there are great plugins for this. Facebook then improves the targeting of who they show your ads to, based on who signed up, and builds in effect a custom audience for your on the fly during the course of the campaign. This results in a much better use of your advertising dollar.

Conclusion

IMHO, having a home page for your podcast is critically important for promoting your podcast. And so is having episode specific show notes pages. Most good podcasts already do. So if you are sending Facebook ad traffic to iTunes and Stitcher, I’d encourage you to do otherwise.

Market & Launch your podcast

This resource guide includes gear guides, platform tips and guidance on how to market and grow your digital presence using podcasting as content strategy.

podcasting as content strategy

Where can we send your guide?

 

Inbound Design vs. Inbound Marketing: How To Make Your Customers Love You

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Credit: MOZ

In the world of marketing, things have changed drastically from traditional methods. While back in the old days you had to rely on “interruption marketing” to find and approach your prospects with outbound ads and sales calls, with everyone online these days you can bring these prospects to you you. What’s changed is that massive amounts of content are written and consumed on-line, and leveraging this successfully is what’s known as inbound marketing, and it is fast becoming the dominant trend.

However, while most companies are focusing on inbound marketing as a means to an end, we at Polymash believe that everything you do should be intentionally designed to make your systems as customer centric and profitable as possible.

What are we talking about? Inbound Design. Today we’ll go over how your whole marketing campaign should be carefully crafted to maximize results. Don’t just generate content and hope for the best, design everything to be a funnel and you will notice your conversion rate increase immediately. Let’s take a look and see how it works.

Inbound Design vs. Inbound Marketing

For the most part, when people talk about inbound marketing they are referring to marketing techniques and its content designed to attract, convert, close and delight people visiting  your website.

Inbound design, on the other hand, is a design thinking approach making sure that your entire presence, including your site, emails, social profiles, content you share and other touch-points your customers may have with you are all expertly curated to provide value through relevant content, develop leads and convert them into new customers. Both of these systems work well together, but most startups, solopreneurs and companies are focused on the traditional marketing side rather than the design thinking side. We hope to change that.

Conversion Optimized Inbound Designs

So what do we mean when we say that your website should be crafted to generate conversions and leads? Well, that ultimately means that it needs to be more customer centric. It needs speak to the visitor’s likely needs, appeal to their desires and speak to their likely issues or problems, providing answers and being focused and engaging all the while. In other words, provide value without being salesy or pushing an agenda. Getting your audience to know, like and trust you gradually is the aim.

It’s Not Just About The Layout

So this implies that you need to design not only the layout of the site, but the entire visiting experience to bring your customers in and provide a call to action so that they take part in your business.

Simplify, often there are gains to be had by reducing the amount of information available on your homepage to its essentials, creating more white-space and thinking about the navigation hierarchy and pathways of likely travel through your site. Resist the temptation to talk too much about how great you, your company and services are. Make it about your site visitor instead.

The more quickly and clearly you can stimulate, engage and activate your clientele the more successful you will be and the more brand recognition and loyalty you will earn. Increasingly affordable marketing automation platforms allow you to recognize return visitors and even to adjust what information your site presents to them – all with the goal to be the most relevant source of information you can be. The goal is a more customer centric website.

So how do you achieve that level of success?

Developing Personas and Value Propositions For Each Visitor Type

user experience design services - persona developmentOK, so now you may be keen to start re-designing your site.  Most people understand that before you start marketing you should have a crystal clear idea of who your target audience is. Whether it’s Millennials who love hip hop music or Boomers who want to learn how to cook, you need to have your demographic dialed in and refined so that everything speaks to them directly. The best way to do this is to create and use personas that match your audience specifically. We’ve written extensively on this site about the  Value Proposition Design and UX techniques involved, so we won’t go into detail, except to address this question:

How do you assign anonymous site traffic to personas?

One way  is to produce laser focused content on topics particular to that persona, content that will educate them or even solve a problem. And then offer relevant premium add-on-content, e-Books, guides, tip sheets or other bonus materials they will very likely want to enhance their knowledge further. When registering for such downloads, your email service provider, forms software or marketing automation then “tags” the visitor with the relevant persona.

Instead of selling them on the product or service itself you want to create a strong feeling of trust first that will make them realize why your content, and ultimately your company is so valuable to them. Ask questions, provide examples, and make your pitch as educational, useful, entertaining and engaging as possible to draw your audience in further and further until they are wondering where they can sign up for more information.

Understanding Inbound Design Patterns

At its core, Inbound Design is all about making your website visits work more BOTH for your visitors, but also for your business.

Instead of it being a passive set of linked pages that lets people journey around your site without a plan, this journey should be DESIGNED by you.

So here are 2 inbound design patterns I’d like to share that are working particularly well for this, if you are courageous enough to deploy them. The first one is the concept of the upside down home page, pioneered by Brian Harris of Video Fruit. He’s graciously made a template available on Lead Pages, but this design can be deployed on many platforms, in fact I have a tutorial for doing this in the popular WordPress Theme “Enfold” we use for a number of clients.

1.) What, No Navigation? – Inbound Design Pattern #1 – The Upside Down Home Page Concept

Tip

To get the full effect of this design pattern, click on the image to the right.

Click on the graphic to the right to see or download a larger design template for the “Upside Down Home Page”. The reason it is called “upside down” is that there is no navigation menu on the top of your home page. None. Zip, zilch, nada.

This is also the reason why I said it takes courage to deploy this method, because most people are very set wanting to meet what they think are visitor’s expectations.

However, notice the massive amount of focus generated by the call to action button above the fold. It’s pretty much like a landing page, so there are only few actions on “upside down” home pages that can be taken. In other words,  you are taking control of your visitor’s journey on your site. Of course, if they do opt in, the thank you pages take on an important role to guide them through the rest of your site, but this is one way to accomplish what we’ve been talking about.

And your calls to action can vary greatly. Ask some empathetic questions above the fold that will identify what their most pressing interest  or problem is. Allow site visitors to self-identify and click on something here that offers value or will help guide their journey through the rest of your site. And if your marketing automation platform allows, these first clicks can help categorize your site visitors into the aforementioned personas.

Keep in mind you don’t have a lot of time for this, when youre site first loads you get about 2 seconds before the average person leaves, or bounces. So whatever is above the fold should pull your visitor in, provoke curiosity and provide a particular focus. If the site isn’t immediately grabbing their attention, then they are liable to bounce, and good design reduces your bounce rate and increases your conversion rate.

The rest of the Upside Down Home Page usually consists of testimonials and other social proof, since cold traffic does not allow for lengthy indoctrination essays on home pages.

And by the way, THERE IS A MENU, but it is small and at the bottom of the page, which gives this design pattern it’s name.

Variations

Personally I like variations on this concept where you present not a single call to action, but a set of three, each solving a different problem for a different persona. So here we are starting to combine what we were talking about personas above with the upside down home page layout, and when someone opts in to your offer, you

  1. Assign them a persona
  2. Vary your follow up sequence, messages and offers based on what they selected
  3. Change the layout and content of what they see on your site (assuming you have a marketing automation platform like SharpSpring that supports this)

In the end, the upside Down Homepage converts like crazy and builds your email list of prospects super fast.

2.) The Boxed Journey – Inbound Design Pattern # 2

Tip

To get the full effect of this design pattern, visit the site or click on the image and keep clicking until you see the image full screen in your browser

Inbound Design Boxed Journey Pattern

You may have to zoom or download this to see it in detail, or simply visit the link to Titanium Fitness

Another slightly more conventional approach is one we have employed often with much success. It combines some aspect of the Upside Down Homepage philosophy, but still has the conventional web site menu at the top.

Consider the redesign of a site we recently did for a client in the fitness sector. The site is for a local gym in St Louis called Titanium Fitness, and the proprietor had several very different target audiences she wanted to attract as clients.

Conventional Slider – with a difference

Conversion Optimization geeks like us hate home page sliders. But they can be used for good, here we made sure their most popular offer is above the fold, a Groupon Coupon deal for first time visitors to their Gym.

The “Boxed Journey”

The Boxed Journey section lives on the top of the site and is designed to let different categories of site visitors self select and choose which path through the site is most relevant and interesting to them.  Each box asks some challenging questions to an issue they are likely to want help with. And offers a solution, or at least some help with common problem they may be facing, implying that the solution is not far away.

Each box also offers direct navigation options to reach the portion of the site they are most interested in, and there the offer is repeated.

The owners were creative in working with us to come up with some relevant concepts, and we then produced the downloadable gifts. Now some people won’t opt in from the top of the page, and will navigate further down. But the “Boxed Journey” continues, because each offer box on the top has a related section where more detail is provided and the offer is repeated.

The goal is to get your site visitor to identify themselves by getting into a journey that provides them with your most relevant content, even if that content is varied.

Wait, Before You Go…

Don’t finish your blind date without asking for a name

You have a visitor on your site. They somehow came there via google search or social media or paid ads.

So don’t let them leave without asking their name! In the end, your layout has a lot to do with making that happen. That’s why you need to pay attention to where everything is and how your audience experiences it. And it’s OK to offer them one last chance at your goodies with an exit intent popup, just to be sure they know what they’re missing.

Creating Captivating Content

I guess you’re saying “duh” at this point. It should go without saying that your marketing materials should be incredible on their own, but we want to make sure that we’re covering all of our bases. Whether it’s a blog post, an image, or a post on social media, everything should be relevant your audience and make them want more.

Each blog post should ideally paired with a super relevant, hard to resist, very specific lead magnet or offer. It is this relevance that gets the audience to be more engaged with the material, the more likely they are to follow it to its source so that they can get more of what they like. While most companies are fine with a shotgun approach (quantity), you should focus more on the details (quality).

Designing For The Top of the Funnel

quality content with a purposeThere is one more thing that many people misunderstand about inbound marketing, and where the solution is to apply some inbound design thinking. And that is understanding the difference between content appropriate for the “top of the funnel” vs for the “bottom of the funnel”.

During your initial interactions with site visitors they may choose to download one of your e-Books, gifts or guides. your job here is to entertain, educate and inform, lightly. Initially these should be designed to be applicable to a broad majority of your site visitors and target personas.

As part of our content design services we often help design and strategize such “lead magnets”  for our clients, because we see too many clients with “one size fits all” lead magnets. At the top of the funnel, for first time site visitors, it’s OK for this material to not be very in-depth – the rule of thumb is that these guides should provide value but not take longer than 5 minutes or so to read. And in exchange, at this early stage in your relationship, you may only ask for an email address and not even a name in exchange for your resource or gift.

However, inbound design implies that the process of getting to know, like and trust your brand only begins here – your email follow up sequences are crucial here and also need to be designed to deliver value, introduce yourself and your brand, set expectations and share further valuable resources, and these will gradually become  more in-depth and even more useful to your audience.

Designing For The Bottom of the Funnel

This is where your contacts become interested in your most valuable content, your more in-depth resources, such as case studies or longer e-books. And it is here that start focusing on selling, converting and closing. At this point, your prospects already know, like and trust you, and that makes it way easier and improves conversion %. Your forms can be designed to ask for additional information, such as last name, phone number, industry, company size etc.

And with your audience having indicated increased interest, you can now provide more information about what you do and why you are their best option for filling that need or solving their problem. While the top is all about instant gratification, the bottom is where you can switch to more traditional outbound sales outreach techniques.

Often, this is where qualified leads get handed over from the marketing to the sales team. If you are a smaller business without a marketing department, this is where owning your own marketing automation platform can help you switch from lead generation to sales mode yourself.

Conclusion

In the end, Inbound Design should not be thought of as a tool, but as a philosophy that helps your business grow by becoming more customer centric. The more you think about your customers and the way they perceive and journey through your site and content, and the more this permeates through all your customer touchpoints and marketing materials, the more successful you will be in the end. Think of it as investing in your future.

 

Forget Design! Working Up The Courage For Digital Transformation

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Canary in the coal mine: How often do you need to re-design your site?

We always ask our clients about what insights finally prompted them to take action to re-invent, re-launch or re-design.

The stories that emerge are often quite compelling, and a good indication of how rapidly things are changing in the online world.

In many cases the realization that their site was “out of date” is prompted by lower business performance, less traffic, lower site rank, fewer people signing up to email lists and so on.

Yet a common perception persists that a site upgrade is largely a cosmetic exercise.

This is just a canary in a coal mine, an indication of more important things that may be going amiss.

Unwelcome news – or digital transformation opportunity in disguise?

unwelcome news or digital transformation opportunitySo it comes as unwelcome news that more deep-rooted causes may be at play. Here you thought all you needed was a new theme, or a cosmetic site upgrade, and the next thing you hear is that online behavior and consumption patterns may have changed enough in the last few years to re-examine not only the type of content but even your existing business models on your site.

But “unwelcome news” can actually be re-framed as an opportunity in disguise

We live in an age or accelarating change, disruption and re-invention. Web sites are not immune, and the typical life-span of a site is now 2-3 years. The opportunity is to use the catalyst of re-designing a site to look more deeply at the health of your online business strategies, and to upgrade your content, product and list building strategies at the same time.

Age discrimination – or failing to address shifting demographics?

When we dig down into the causes of “outdated websites”, some folks understandably get defensive about their existing online presence.

  • People are proud of their older sites, even when they realize a change is needed
  • It worked well in the past
  • A lot of effort and expense went into the design

When I was a graphic design a photography student, this is the sign that hung above our darkroom:

The first line of defense is usually to blame the design or visual appeal of the site itself. And the last thing anyone wants to look at are more deeply rooted business decisions or product strategies. And there are usually other, deeper factors at play, as people’s online behavior, preferences and content consumption patterns are continually changing.

  • Attention spans have gotten shorter
  • Mobile devices may be a slight misnomer: it’s people who are in fact mobile, constantly connected and expectating to consume and engage with content on the go
  • User interface design has changed to accomodate mobile responsive screens
  • The rise of short form social media sharing has shaped our communication patterns
  • Email marketing and list building methods (as well as overall content strategy) have changed.
  • If a site is older than 5 years, there is a likely significant shift in the demographic of site visitors

So the term “age discrimination” is a bit harsh – it’s not that younger people are intentionally avoiding our content; we may simply be missing the opportunity to present our content in a way that honors evolving consumer preferences.

Evolving content preferences

I actually seem to see a big “age” related phenomena, in terms of long form emails and newsletters preferences still prevalent with Baby Boomer (50-64) and Greatest Generation (65+) consumers. It requires patience and a certain attention span to read long emails and newsletters. However for consumers below 40, super short skimmable content is increasingly necessary.

  • So from a persona perspective, list building and newsletter success these days may depend on nailing the age group persona being targeted, and being flexible enough to adjust to their preferences in the delivery format and perceived value of content.

I am constantly working with clients my age (in their 50s) that write hugely long form blog posts, lead magnets and emails, and somehow fail to connect with the younger audience that would like to attract and ultimately target.

Some tips to “Shorten Up”

  • Our recommendation is to write extremely short paragraphs, and to break paragraphs up with (H2) headlines frequently. This introduces white space into the copy, and makes content much more “skimmable”.
  • If you have an email newsletter, resist sending entire articles to your list. Instead offer short and concise headlines, a thumbnail image and teaser excerpts that encourage your newsletter readers to visit your blog for the rest of the story, earning you SEO credit in the process.
  • My theory is that writing for short attention span, skimmable content, design patterns with lots of white-space and emphasis on 1-3 minute videos are necessary to connect with a younger audience, and this is a skill that few of us older, “long form” and academic types are good at:)

Evolving pricing strategies for content owners and digital product creators

We work with a lot of content owners and digital product creators, and we often see pricing and overall product strategies for knowledge products lagging behind in a way similar to web design patterns.

The same dynamics of changing consumer preferences apply, and just as some content owners are resiting to shorter content formats, they also resist lower their digital product pricing to accomodate the market.

Of course there can not be a hard and fast rules for this, and I do not mean to imply that the overall value based pricing should be diminished.
But consumer perception on price points for knowledge products and what the market will bear for typical courses or coaching experiences change. The fact that 100s if not 1000s of online courses, universities and learning tools have sprung up in the last few years have, in my optioning, changed the perceived value and landscape of e-learning.

Some work-around tips and possible examples of alternative pricing approaches

  • I see a lot of people re-positioning and breaking up their existing mega-courses or mega digital products into bite sized components that can withstand the markets price expectation and preference for a la carte learning.
  • To launch a mega product or course as the first offering is considered my many to be a productization mistake
  • Modern courseware and digital product environments accommodate free content or courses as appetizers, and then very low cost bite sized courses as the core offering, and finally membership models and premium benefits of “in person” experiences being offered as part of a community site.
  • So in the end the same amount of content can be broken up and presented in smaller and more a la carte ways, while at the same time lowering price points and attracting a new audience.

Conclusion & Recommendations

  • Don’t just think of your site re-design project as a cosmetic excercise
  • Talk to a digital strategist, not just to web designers, and have a more wide-rangingconversation about hidden opportunities you may be overlooking
  • Too many people would rather be hurt by compliments than saved by criticism: Be open to wider ranging changes to your products, services, pricing and content
  • Download our “Ultimate Website Re-Design Checklist” and be honest with yourself.

3 Practical SEO Image Optimization Tricks Podcasters Need To Know

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Lesson 4 of 5

THE SEO FOR PODCASTERS (AND BLOGGERS) COURSE


The SEO for Podcasters series is a step by step guide to all the techniques we use for our clients. We ensure their podcast show notes are driving traffic to their sites and are ranked highly on Google and other search engines.

An often overlooked SEO factor for podcasters is that images in posts contribute to SEO rankings. Of course the images should be interesting and relevant in the first place, but technically the way images contribute to your SEO ranking has to do with “ALT” tags, as well as with their role in determining your site loading speed.

1.) Use ALT Text Tags For SEO Image Optimization

What are ALT text tags?

A WordPress example of Alt TextThe official definition of ALT text (alternative text) is a word or phrase that can be inserted as an attribute in an HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) document to tell Web site viewers the nature or contents of an image. The ALT text appears in a blank box that would normally contain the image. This is useful when an image link is not available because of a broken or changed URL or some other issue.

Why are they important for SEO?

Also, ALT tags serve as accessibility properties that provide the visually disabled, (who use screen reader software to read page content out loud), with information about each image. This has the additional side effect that search engines pick up these ALT tags as well and index your article based on the image ALT tag language used. So for SEO Image Optimization, if you can use your main article key-phrase in the ALT tag, it will add to your overall SEO post optimization and keyword density in a positive way.

Do’s and Dont’s

  • Do honor the intent of creating accessible sites that provide screen readers and search engines with context and recognition of what is going on in the image
  • Do not stuff indiscriminately keywords into the ALT tags in a way that makes screen readers annoying, inaccurate or not useful
  • Do use descriptions that describe the image in a meaningful way, while utilizing your key-phrase

To include an “ALT” tag, it is added to each image in the following ways:

  • In WordPress, you don’t need to know HTML to do this, you can add the ALT tag in the media library, or when you are adding the image to the post
  • If you want to know what this looks like in HTML, you would simply add alt=“Description of the image” to your image tag
  • For example, if you wanted to add an image with a podcasting microphone, that might look like so:
<img src=“microphone.jpg” alt=“Podcasting Microphone”/>
WordPress Tip

WordPress tip on using the same image several times:

Keep in mind that if you’ve already used an image and created an ALT Text tag for a previous posts, changing that image’s ALT text tag might negatively affect the SEO ranking of previous posts. A typical example of this are featured images in posts. If you have already used an image on a post once before, it is likely to already have an ALT tag assigned optimized for a previous SEO keyword.

  • Therefore if you would like to use it again it is better to upload a new version of the image, even if it already exists in your media library.

 

2.) Understand Your Site Load Speed

Site load speed has been a search rank factor for a long time, and the speed that your page loads is directly influenced by the size of the images present on your pages. WordPress and most themes process images into several sizes when you first upload them, so that thumbnails and several small to large size variations can be used. But WordPress compression algorithms are often not ideal.

Tools to help you understand your site load speed

We have tried to list some great SEO tools throughout this series, and image processing tools are often overlooked. We’ll get to these in a minute, but first of all it helps to you know if images on your site contribute to slow loading speeds, and by how much. Here are 2 tools that help you measure the loading speed of your site, and allow you to compare before and after optimization.

GTmetrix assists in SEO image optimizationGTmetrix

  • GTmetrix: A free service that gives you insight on how well your site loads and provides actionable recommendations on how to optimize it

Yslow

  • Yslow: Yahoo!’s Exceptional Performance team has identified 34 rules that affect web page performance. YSlow’YSlow Logos web page analysis tests your site against 34 rules that affect web page performance, and is based on the 23 of these 34 rules that are testable.

 

3.) Improve Your Site Speed By Optimizing Your Images

Once you decide you’d like to optimize your site images in order to improve load times, here are some tools that help you do it.

  • If you have an existing site with lots of images, a utility to help optimize these is great, but in general terms I would also recommend to pre-process and size images for use on your web site when you first upload these or create them in Photoshop or your favorite graphics program.
  • Uploading 12,000px wide images straight from your camera is lazy, and there is no use for these on your site without first optimizing them, and utilities like Snap-Converter mentioned below make this process very easy.

So in general terms I recommend optimizing images before they ever make it to your site.

That said, here are some great tools:

WP Smush

  • WP Smush Pro For SEO image optimizationWP Smush is the popular replacement of the Smush-It image optimization plugin based on a service once provided by Yahoo, but now discontinued
  • WP Smush Pro is a premium image optimization tool that uses advanced algorithms to compress your images while maintaining their quality and dramatically improving your website’s page speed.
  • It will go through your entire media library and replace your on-line images with optimized versions, while maintaining quality. This can significantly speed up your site. Run GTmetrix before and after, and you will be rewarded with a vastly improved site load speed, and Google rank.
  • It also processes every new image you upload, so you can be assured that all of your site images are compressed optimally.

Snap-Converter

  • Snap ConverterSnap Converter (for Mac) is a utility to help you resize as well as convert images from PNG to JPG
  • Convert images as well as Mac and Windows icon files. Supports standard bitmap types as well as digital Camera RAW types, Photoshop documents, and more. View the complete list of supported file types.

Resize SenseResize Sense

  • Resize Sense is a utility that helps crop and resize images to a variety of optimized sizes.
  • Very useful for when you need to convert a range of differently sized images into the same size and aspect ratio.
  • Helps to eliminate the hours of tedious work needed to resize, crop, straighten, rotate, flip, edit metadata, and rename many images one at a time.


Market & Launch your podcast

This resource guide includes gear guides, platform tips and guidance on how to market and grow your digital presence using podcasting as content strategy.

podcasting as content strategy

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Podcast SEO Course Overview

Lesson 1Lesson 2Lesson 3You Are HereLesson 5
How To Make Podcast SEO Optimization Work for You6 Proven Keyword Strategies Podcasters And Bloggers LoveGreat Podcast Episode Titles – Use these 4 SEO Techniques 3 Practical SEO Image Optimization Tricks Podcasters Need To KnowHow To Increase Your Traffic With Search Result Visualization
An overview of the concepts covered in this SEO training series for podcasters and bloggersMisconceptions of keyword research, and how to do it rightThe importance of creating compelling episode titles, both for SEO and click-worthiness There are many ways in which images contribute to SEO of your siteTips on crafting a good search result snippets to increase traffic to your site